Studies on the control of fungal contamination and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus link in a cereal grain by the combination treatment of heat and irradiation

G.T. Odamtten

    Research output: Thesisexternal PhD, WUAcademic

    Abstract

    Traditional storage of maize in tropical countries such as Ghana results in the rapid development of numerous fungi, including potential mycotoxin producers such as <em>Aspergillus flavus</em> (aflatoxins), <em>A. ochraceus</em> (ochratoxins, penicillic acid), <em>Fusarium moniliforme</em> (moniliformin), <em>Paecilomyces varioti</em> and <em>Penicillium expansum</em> (patulin). Treatment of maize with a combination of mist heat (30 min. at 60 °C and relative humidity>85%) and gamma irradiation (4.0 kGy) proved to be effective in inactivating the resident population of fungal spores. This result was confirmed by <em>in vitro</em> studies with spores of <em>Aspergillus flavus</em> NRRL 5906. In a comparative study of packaging materials it was found that food commodities stored in woven polypropylene bags for six months at 85% R.H. had mould and yeast counts which were 2-3 log cycles lower than those of products kept in jute bags. Also, the viability of the seeds was better preserved in polypropylene sacks.<p>It is recommended that the combination treatment be carried out m good quality grains, and that woven polypropylene sacks are used in bagging prior to irradiation, for maximum extension of shelf-life.<p><TT></TT>
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Kampelmacher, E.H., Promotor, External person
    • Rombouts, F.M., Promotor, External person
    Award date4 Nov 1986
    Place of PublicationWageningen
    Publisher
    Publication statusPublished - 1986

    Fingerprint

    Aspergillus flavus
    aflatoxins
    bags
    small cereal grains
    polypropylenes
    irradiation
    heat treatment
    penicillic acid
    Paecilomyces
    commodity foods
    patulin
    ochratoxins
    Penicillium expansum
    jute
    corn
    fungal spores
    packaging materials
    Ghana
    in vitro studies
    molds (fungi)

    Keywords

    • food irradiation
    • heat treatment
    • maize
    • storage
    • zea mays
    • fungus control
    • aflatoxins
    • aspergillus flavus

    Cite this

    @phdthesis{6d034175dfed4beb910e81f60428aa18,
    title = "Studies on the control of fungal contamination and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus link in a cereal grain by the combination treatment of heat and irradiation",
    abstract = "Traditional storage of maize in tropical countries such as Ghana results in the rapid development of numerous fungi, including potential mycotoxin producers such as Aspergillus flavus (aflatoxins), A. ochraceus (ochratoxins, penicillic acid), Fusarium moniliforme (moniliformin), Paecilomyces varioti and Penicillium expansum (patulin). Treatment of maize with a combination of mist heat (30 min. at 60 °C and relative humidity>85{\%}) and gamma irradiation (4.0 kGy) proved to be effective in inactivating the resident population of fungal spores. This result was confirmed by in vitro studies with spores of Aspergillus flavus NRRL 5906. In a comparative study of packaging materials it was found that food commodities stored in woven polypropylene bags for six months at 85{\%} R.H. had mould and yeast counts which were 2-3 log cycles lower than those of products kept in jute bags. Also, the viability of the seeds was better preserved in polypropylene sacks.It is recommended that the combination treatment be carried out m good quality grains, and that woven polypropylene sacks are used in bagging prior to irradiation, for maximum extension of shelf-life.<TT>",
    keywords = "voedselbestraling, warmtebehandeling, ma{\"i}s, opslag, zea mays, schimmelbestrijding, aflatoxinen, aspergillus flavus, food irradiation, heat treatment, maize, storage, zea mays, fungus control, aflatoxins, aspergillus flavus",
    author = "G.T. Odamtten",
    note = "WU thesis 1100 Proefschrift Wageningen",
    year = "1986",
    language = "English",
    publisher = "Odamtten",

    }

    TY - THES

    T1 - Studies on the control of fungal contamination and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus link in a cereal grain by the combination treatment of heat and irradiation

    AU - Odamtten, G.T.

    N1 - WU thesis 1100 Proefschrift Wageningen

    PY - 1986

    Y1 - 1986

    N2 - Traditional storage of maize in tropical countries such as Ghana results in the rapid development of numerous fungi, including potential mycotoxin producers such as Aspergillus flavus (aflatoxins), A. ochraceus (ochratoxins, penicillic acid), Fusarium moniliforme (moniliformin), Paecilomyces varioti and Penicillium expansum (patulin). Treatment of maize with a combination of mist heat (30 min. at 60 °C and relative humidity>85%) and gamma irradiation (4.0 kGy) proved to be effective in inactivating the resident population of fungal spores. This result was confirmed by in vitro studies with spores of Aspergillus flavus NRRL 5906. In a comparative study of packaging materials it was found that food commodities stored in woven polypropylene bags for six months at 85% R.H. had mould and yeast counts which were 2-3 log cycles lower than those of products kept in jute bags. Also, the viability of the seeds was better preserved in polypropylene sacks.It is recommended that the combination treatment be carried out m good quality grains, and that woven polypropylene sacks are used in bagging prior to irradiation, for maximum extension of shelf-life.<TT>

    AB - Traditional storage of maize in tropical countries such as Ghana results in the rapid development of numerous fungi, including potential mycotoxin producers such as Aspergillus flavus (aflatoxins), A. ochraceus (ochratoxins, penicillic acid), Fusarium moniliforme (moniliformin), Paecilomyces varioti and Penicillium expansum (patulin). Treatment of maize with a combination of mist heat (30 min. at 60 °C and relative humidity>85%) and gamma irradiation (4.0 kGy) proved to be effective in inactivating the resident population of fungal spores. This result was confirmed by in vitro studies with spores of Aspergillus flavus NRRL 5906. In a comparative study of packaging materials it was found that food commodities stored in woven polypropylene bags for six months at 85% R.H. had mould and yeast counts which were 2-3 log cycles lower than those of products kept in jute bags. Also, the viability of the seeds was better preserved in polypropylene sacks.It is recommended that the combination treatment be carried out m good quality grains, and that woven polypropylene sacks are used in bagging prior to irradiation, for maximum extension of shelf-life.<TT>

    KW - voedselbestraling

    KW - warmtebehandeling

    KW - maïs

    KW - opslag

    KW - zea mays

    KW - schimmelbestrijding

    KW - aflatoxinen

    KW - aspergillus flavus

    KW - food irradiation

    KW - heat treatment

    KW - maize

    KW - storage

    KW - zea mays

    KW - fungus control

    KW - aflatoxins

    KW - aspergillus flavus

    M3 - external PhD, WU

    PB - Odamtten

    CY - Wageningen

    ER -