Strategies for the environmental management of chains

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The ways to reduce the discharge of pollutants are diverse. End-of-pipe measures, cleaner production technologies and environmentally oriented product design is the spectrum in which solutions can be found. To implement such measures, and ultimately close industrial cycles, companies have to organize themselves to reach that goal. Closed production systems in this perspective are not a technological problem, but an organisational problem. In organizational terms, closed systems are also distinguished. DuPont's director of logistics (Clifford Sayre) defined Supply Chain Management (SCM) as a closed loop: 'It starts with the customer and it ends with the customer. Through the loop flow all materials and finished goods, information, even all transactions.' Chain co-operation is also becoming an economic necessity. One of the most significant paradigm shifts of modern business management is that individual businesses no longer compete as solely autonomous entities, but rather as supply chains (Christopher 1998). Strictly speaking, the supply chain is not a chain of businesses with one-to-one, business-to-business relationships, but a network of multiple businesses and relationships. Executives are becoming aware that the successful co-ordination, integration and management of key business processes across members of the supply chain will determine the ultimate success of the single enterprise (Van der Vorst 2000). Lambert and Cooper (2000) underline this growing awareness of executives in their research agenda for Supply Chain Management (SCM). According to them, a top priority in SCM should be research to develop a normative model that can guide managers in their efforts to develop and manage their supply chains. The managerial trend of developing chains also fits in with the ideas to cope with environmental damage
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWater recycling and resources recovery in Industry: Analysis, technologies and implementation
EditorsP. Lens, L. Hulshoff-Pol, P. Wilderer, T. Asano
Pages109-131
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • environmental protection
  • production
  • industrial processing quality
  • supply chain management

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    Hagelaar, J. L. F., & van der Vorst, J. G. A. J. (2002). Strategies for the environmental management of chains. In P. Lens, L. Hulshoff-Pol, P. Wilderer, & T. Asano (Eds.), Water recycling and resources recovery in Industry: Analysis, technologies and implementation (pp. 109-131)