State of the art regarding carrot fly control in practice and possibilities in the future for Western and Northern Europe

A. Ester, K. van Rozen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    The carrot fly (Psila rosae) is a major pest of umbelliferous crops, particularly in carrot production. This pest is present in temperate regions of Northern and Western Europe and also in the warm and dry climate of Central and Southern Europe. Currently, control strategies are limited and there may be a bottleneck of pest control solutions in the future. In practice, growers in the Netherlands mainly rely on a commercial, supervised control system which monitors the carrot fly population pressure. Possibilities to control the carrot fly after exceeding an economical threshold are reduced due to a lack of efficient chemical insecticides. Another option is the use of seed treatment to protect the carrots against the larvae developed from the first flight of the carrot flies for 12¿14 weeks after sowing. The state of the art of the carrot fly pest and control possibilities are hereby discussed. Bottlenecks in control of carrot flies are highlighted and described
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)138-142
    JournalEPPO Bulletin
    Volume39
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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