Stabilizing effects of excipients on dissociation of intact (146S) foot-and-mouth disease virions into 12S particles during storage as oil-emulsion vaccine

M.M. Harmsen, H.P.D. Fijten, D.F. Westra, A. Dekker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most conventional foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccines contain oil-adjuvant. Their potency decreases upon prolonged storage. Intact (146S) FMDV particles can dissociate into 12S degradation products with a concomitant decrease in immunogenicity. We therefore measured virion stability in vaccines using two previously developed ELISAs to separately quantify 12S and 146S particles. Virions completely dissociated into 12S particles within 3 months after oil-emulsification. Dissociation occurred at a much lower rate in a comparable aqueous solution that was not oil-emulsified. Thus, oil-emulsification stimulates virion dissociation, presumably due to the protein denaturing effect of the oil–water interface. In real-time stability studies the stability of oil-adjuvanted virions of four different FMDV strains was significantly increased by addition of sucrose and BSA in a synergistic manner. Contrary to BSA addition, the effect of sucrose addition was concentration dependent. This study illustrates the importance of analysing antigen integrity after oil-emulsification and provides methods for FMDV vaccine stabilization.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2477-2484
JournalVaccine
Volume33
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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