Stability and effectiveness against bacterial adhesion of poly(ethylene oxide) coatings in biological fluids

A. Roosjen, J. de Vries, H.C. van der Mei, W. Norde, H.J. Busscher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

85 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) coatings have been shown to reduce the adhesion of different microbial strains and species and thus are promising as coatings to prevent biomaterial-centered infection of medical implants. Clinically, however, PEO coatings are not yet applied, as little is known about their stability and effectiveness in biological fluids. In this study, PEO coatings coupled to a glass substratum through silyl ether bonds were exposed for different time intervals to saliva, urine, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as a reference at 37°C. After exposure, the effectiveness of the coatings against bacterial adhesion was assessed in a parallel plate flow chamber. The coatings appeared effective against Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion for 24, 48, and 0.5 h in PBS, urine, and saliva, respectively. Using XPS and contact-angle measurements, the variations in effectiveness could be attributed to conditioning film formation. The overall short stability results from hydrolysis of the coupling of the PEO chains to the substratum.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-354
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B : Applied Biomaterials
Volume73B
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • streptococcus-mutans adherence
  • protein adsorption
  • polyethylene-glycol
  • microbial adhesion
  • flow chamber
  • surfaces
  • inhibition
  • brushes
  • chains
  • contamination

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Stability and effectiveness against bacterial adhesion of poly(ethylene oxide) coatings in biological fluids'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this