Spray-dried microfibrillated cellulose particles as texture modifier in liquid foods and their effect on rheological, tribological and sensory properties

A.E. Blok*, D.P. Bolhuis, Krassimir P. Velikov, M.A. Stieger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) has potential to be used as clean label texture modifier in foods due to its structural and mechanical properties. These properties deteriorate upon drying of MFC dispersions due to aggregation of the microfibrils. In this study dried MFC particles were prepared by spray-drying MFC dispersions in a surplus of maltodextrin to prevent hornification. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of MFC particle concentration and MFC:maltodextrin ratio of dried MFC powders on rheological, tribological and sensory texture properties of liquid foods. Scanning Electron Microscopy demonstrated that after spray-drying, MFC powders with polydisperse particle size distribution were obtained (1–30 μm). Upon suspension of spray-dried MFC powder in water, maltodextrin dissolved in the aqueous continuous phase whereas spherical MFC networks retained their shape and co-existed in a mixture with individual fibrils. Spray-dried MFC powders were added to skimmed milk and tomato soup at different concentrations. With increasing concentration of dried MFC particles, shear viscosity, consistency index K, storage and loss modulus of skimmed milks and tomato soups increased whereas flow index n decreased. Addition of spray-dried MFC particles to milks and soups significantly (p < 0.05) increased sensory thickness and creaminess. Milks displayed similar tribological properties irrespective of MFC particle concentration, which was presumably caused by exclusion of the MFC network from the tribological gap. Rheological properties, thickness and creaminess increased more effectively upon addition of low MFC:maltodextrin particles compared to particles with high MFC:maltodextrin ratio. We conclude that spray-dried microfibrillated cellulose particles can be used as thickener or fat replacer in liquid foods.
Original languageEnglish
Article number108398
JournalFood Hydrocolloids
Volume138
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2022

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