Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts

M.A. Goedknegt, Anne Karin Schuster, Christian Buschbaum, René Gergs, A.S. Jung, Pieternella C. Luttikhuizen, Jaap van der Meer, Karin Troost, K.M. Wegner, David W. Thieltges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and spillback (native or established parasites infect invasive hosts and re-infect native hosts) scenarios of recently introduced (Mytilicola orientalis) and previously established (Mytilicola intestinalis) marine parasitic copepods in two regions in northern Europe, the Dutch Delta and the Wadden Sea. By examining 3416 individuals of 11 potential host species from sympatric host populations, we found that the recently introduced parasite M. orientalis does not only infect its principal host, the invasive Pacific oyster (prevalence at infected sites 2–43 %, mean intensity 4.1 ± 0.6 SE), but also native blue mussels (Mytilus edulis; 3–63 %, 2.1 ± 0.2), common cockles (Cerastoderma edule; 2–13 %, 1.2 ± 0.3) and Baltic tellins (Macoma balthica; 6–7 %, 1.0 ± 0), confirming a spillover effect. Spillback effects were not observed as the previously established M. intestinalis was exclusively found in blue mussels (prevalence at infected locations 3–72 %, mean intensity 2.4 ± 0.3 SE). The high frequency of M. orientalis spillover, in particular to native mussels, suggests that Pacific oysters may cause strong parasite-mediated indirect impacts on native bivalve populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-379
JournalBiological Invasions
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Crassostrea gigas
Mytilicola orientalis
bivalve
Bivalvia
Copepoda
Mytilicola intestinalis
parasite
Mytilus edulis
parasites
host-parasite interaction
spillover effect
Cerastoderma edule
disease occurrence
host-parasite relationships
Northern European region
invasive species
native species
mussels
biota
indigenous species

Keywords

  • Invasive species
  • Mytilicola intestinalis
  • Mytilicola orientalis
  • Mytilus edulis
  • Parasite co-introduction
  • Wadden Sea

Cite this

Goedknegt, M. A., Schuster, A. K., Buschbaum, C., Gergs, R., Jung, A. S., Luttikhuizen, P. C., ... Thieltges, D. W. (2017). Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts. Biological Invasions, 19(1), 365-379. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1285-0
Goedknegt, M.A. ; Schuster, Anne Karin ; Buschbaum, Christian ; Gergs, René ; Jung, A.S. ; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C. ; van der Meer, Jaap ; Troost, Karin ; Wegner, K.M. ; Thieltges, David W. / Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts. In: Biological Invasions. 2017 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 365-379.
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title = "Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts",
abstract = "Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and spillback (native or established parasites infect invasive hosts and re-infect native hosts) scenarios of recently introduced (Mytilicola orientalis) and previously established (Mytilicola intestinalis) marine parasitic copepods in two regions in northern Europe, the Dutch Delta and the Wadden Sea. By examining 3416 individuals of 11 potential host species from sympatric host populations, we found that the recently introduced parasite M. orientalis does not only infect its principal host, the invasive Pacific oyster (prevalence at infected sites 2–43 {\%}, mean intensity 4.1 ± 0.6 SE), but also native blue mussels (Mytilus edulis; 3–63 {\%}, 2.1 ± 0.2), common cockles (Cerastoderma edule; 2–13 {\%}, 1.2 ± 0.3) and Baltic tellins (Macoma balthica; 6–7 {\%}, 1.0 ± 0), confirming a spillover effect. Spillback effects were not observed as the previously established M. intestinalis was exclusively found in blue mussels (prevalence at infected locations 3–72 {\%}, mean intensity 2.4 ± 0.3 SE). The high frequency of M. orientalis spillover, in particular to native mussels, suggests that Pacific oysters may cause strong parasite-mediated indirect impacts on native bivalve populations.",
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author = "M.A. Goedknegt and Schuster, {Anne Karin} and Christian Buschbaum and Ren{\'e} Gergs and A.S. Jung and Luttikhuizen, {Pieternella C.} and {van der Meer}, Jaap and Karin Troost and K.M. Wegner and Thieltges, {David W.}",
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Goedknegt, MA, Schuster, AK, Buschbaum, C, Gergs, R, Jung, AS, Luttikhuizen, PC, van der Meer, J, Troost, K, Wegner, KM & Thieltges, DW 2017, 'Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts', Biological Invasions, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 365-379. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1285-0

Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts. / Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, Anne Karin; Buschbaum, Christian; Gergs, René; Jung, A.S.; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; van der Meer, Jaap; Troost, Karin; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, David W.

In: Biological Invasions, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2017, p. 365-379.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts

AU - Goedknegt, M.A.

AU - Schuster, Anne Karin

AU - Buschbaum, Christian

AU - Gergs, René

AU - Jung, A.S.

AU - Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.

AU - van der Meer, Jaap

AU - Troost, Karin

AU - Wegner, K.M.

AU - Thieltges, David W.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and spillback (native or established parasites infect invasive hosts and re-infect native hosts) scenarios of recently introduced (Mytilicola orientalis) and previously established (Mytilicola intestinalis) marine parasitic copepods in two regions in northern Europe, the Dutch Delta and the Wadden Sea. By examining 3416 individuals of 11 potential host species from sympatric host populations, we found that the recently introduced parasite M. orientalis does not only infect its principal host, the invasive Pacific oyster (prevalence at infected sites 2–43 %, mean intensity 4.1 ± 0.6 SE), but also native blue mussels (Mytilus edulis; 3–63 %, 2.1 ± 0.2), common cockles (Cerastoderma edule; 2–13 %, 1.2 ± 0.3) and Baltic tellins (Macoma balthica; 6–7 %, 1.0 ± 0), confirming a spillover effect. Spillback effects were not observed as the previously established M. intestinalis was exclusively found in blue mussels (prevalence at infected locations 3–72 %, mean intensity 2.4 ± 0.3 SE). The high frequency of M. orientalis spillover, in particular to native mussels, suggests that Pacific oysters may cause strong parasite-mediated indirect impacts on native bivalve populations.

AB - Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and spillback (native or established parasites infect invasive hosts and re-infect native hosts) scenarios of recently introduced (Mytilicola orientalis) and previously established (Mytilicola intestinalis) marine parasitic copepods in two regions in northern Europe, the Dutch Delta and the Wadden Sea. By examining 3416 individuals of 11 potential host species from sympatric host populations, we found that the recently introduced parasite M. orientalis does not only infect its principal host, the invasive Pacific oyster (prevalence at infected sites 2–43 %, mean intensity 4.1 ± 0.6 SE), but also native blue mussels (Mytilus edulis; 3–63 %, 2.1 ± 0.2), common cockles (Cerastoderma edule; 2–13 %, 1.2 ± 0.3) and Baltic tellins (Macoma balthica; 6–7 %, 1.0 ± 0), confirming a spillover effect. Spillback effects were not observed as the previously established M. intestinalis was exclusively found in blue mussels (prevalence at infected locations 3–72 %, mean intensity 2.4 ± 0.3 SE). The high frequency of M. orientalis spillover, in particular to native mussels, suggests that Pacific oysters may cause strong parasite-mediated indirect impacts on native bivalve populations.

KW - Invasive species

KW - Mytilicola intestinalis

KW - Mytilicola orientalis

KW - Mytilus edulis

KW - Parasite co-introduction

KW - Wadden Sea

U2 - 10.1007/s10530-016-1285-0

DO - 10.1007/s10530-016-1285-0

M3 - Article

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SP - 365

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JO - Biological Invasions

JF - Biological Invasions

SN - 1387-3547

IS - 1

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