Spatial variability of methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide emissions from drained grasslands.

A. van den Pol-van Dasselaar, W.J. Corre, A. Prieme, A.K. Klemedtsson, P. Weslien, A. Stein, L. Klemedtsson, O. Oenema

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Abstract

Emissions of CH4, N2O, and CO2 from soils are the result of a number of biological and physical processes, each influenced by several environmental and management factors exhibiting spatial variability. This study aimed to assess the spatial variability and spatial dependence of CH4, N2O, and CO2 emissions and their underlying soil processes and properties from grasslands on drained peat soil (Terric Histosol). Emissions and possible controlling factors were measured at a field location in Sweden. Measurements were done on two adjacent sites on peat soil on two successive days for each site. Spatial variability was analyzed with trend analysis and variograms. Both sites consumed small amounts of atmospheric CH4, i.e., 0.03 and 0.05 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, and emitted N2O and CO2, i.e., 5 to 19 mg N2O m-2 d-1 and 4 to 6 g CO2 m-62 d-1. Spatial variability of emissions was high, with coefficients of variation of 50 to 1400&Eth;Emissions either showed a spatial trend or were spatially dependent with ranges of spatial dependence of 50 to >200 m. However, spatial dependence of emissions showed differences between sites and short-term temporal variability. Variograms of emissions and soil processes, which are partly biological in nature and have a high degree of inherent variability, should be interpreted with care. Emissions of CH4, N2O, and CO2 from soils are the result of a number of biological and physical processes, each influenced by several environmental and management factors exhibiting spatial variability. This study aimed to assess the spatial variability and spatial dependence of CH4, N2O, and CO2 emissions and their underlying soil processes and properties from grasslands on drained peat soil (Terric Histosol). Emissions and possible controlling factors were measured at a field location in Sweden. Measurements were done on two adjacent sites on peat soil on two successive days for each site. Spatial variability was analyzed with trend analysis and variograms. Both sites consumed small amounts of atmospheric CH4, i.e., 0.03 and 0.05 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, and emitted N2O and CO2, i.e., 5 to 19 mg N2O m-2 d-1 and 4 to 6 g CO2 m-2 d-1. Spatial variability of emissions was high, with coefficients of variation of 50 to 1400&Eth;Emissions either showed a spatial trend or were spatially dependent with ranges of spatial dependence of 50 to >200 m. However, spatial dependence of emissions showed differences between sites and short-term temporal variability. Variograms of emissions and soil processes, which are partly biological in nature and have a high degree of inherent variability, should be interpreted with care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)810-817
JournalSoil Science Society of America Journal
Volume62
Publication statusPublished - 1998

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