Soil profiles: the more we see, the more we understand

A.E. Hartemink

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Abstract

The aesthetics of soils have fascinated soil scientists in all times. Since the late 1800s soil profile drawings, paintings and photographs have been depicted in hundreds of text books. The first soil profile depictions were simple diagrams illustrating different layers and soil processes. Photographs started to appear in textbooks at the end of the nineteenth century. In the 1950s, several books contained water paintings and from the 1970s onwards text books had colour photographs. Soil profile depictions were merely used to illustrate different orders in a classification system. Since the 1990s, efforts have been made to depict the soil profile in 3D. The depiction of soil profiles follows the understanding of the key properties and processes that have formed a soil.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World, Brisbane, Australia, 1-6 August 2010
EditorsR.J. Gilkes, N. Prakongkap
Pages19-21
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World, Brisbane, Australia -
Duration: 1 Aug 20106 Aug 2010

Conference

Conference19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World, Brisbane, Australia
Period1/08/106/08/10

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Soil profiles: the more we see, the more we understand'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Hartemink, A. E. (2010). Soil profiles: the more we see, the more we understand. In R. J. Gilkes, & N. Prakongkap (Eds.), Proceedings 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World, Brisbane, Australia, 1-6 August 2010 (pp. 19-21) https://edepot.wur.nl/172040