Small-scale farmers, certification schemes and private standards: is there a business case? : costs and benefits of certification and verification systems for small-scale producers in cocoa, coffee, cotton, fruit and vegetable sectors

M. Kuit, Y.R. Waarts

    Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

    Abstract

    Certification of agricultural products is an increasingly common tool that is expected to contribute to agricultural improvement, farmer well-being, poverty alleviation, reduced environmental impact and food safety. In an increasingly competitive market, processors, manufacturers and retailers use certification to demonstrate their green and sustainable credentials and differentiate their products. In some commodity sectors, such as coffee and cocoa, products certified as sustainable are on track to reach majority market share in important producing and consuming nations. This development poses a major challenge for farmers in general, and small-scale farmers in ACP and other developing countries, in particular. This publication, commissioned by CTA, presents the findings of a study of the impact of certification on farmers in coffee, cocoa, cotton, fruit and vegetables.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationWageningen
    PublisherTechnical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU (CTA)
    Number of pages148
    ISBN (Print)9789290815686
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Publication series

    NameValue Chains & Trade
    PublisherTechnical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU (CTA)

    Keywords

    • certification
    • farmers
    • food marketing
    • food industry
    • food products
    • food quality
    • small farms
    • peasant farming
    • cost benefit analysis

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