Slow Food: Sustained Impact of Harder Foods on the Reduction in Energy Intake over the Course of the Day

D.P. Bolhuis, C.G. Forde, Y.J. Cheng, H.H. Xu, N. Martin, C. de Graaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous research has shown that oral processing characteristics like bite size and oral residence duration are related to the satiating efficiency of foods. Oral processing characteristics are influenced by food texture. Very little research has been done on the effect of food texture within solid foods on energy intake. Objectives: The first objective was to investigate the effect of hardness of food on energy intake at lunch, and to link this effect to differences in food oral processing characteristics. The second objective was to investigate whether the reduction in energy intake at lunch will be compensated for in the subsequent dinner. Design: Fifty subjects (11 male, BMI: 21 +/- 2 kg/m(2), age: 24 +/- 2 y) participated in a cross-over study in which they consumed ad libitum from a lunch with soft foods or hard foods on two separate days. Oral processing characteristics at lunch were assessed by coding video records. Later on the same days, subjects consumed dinner ad libitum. Results: Hard foods led to a similar to 13% lower energy intake at lunch compared to soft foods (P <0.001). Hard foods were consumed with smaller bites, longer oral duration per gram food, and more chewing per gram food compared to the soft foods (P <0.05). Energy intake at dinner did not differ after both lunches (P=0.16). Conclusions: Hard foods led to reduced energy intake compared to soft foods, and this reduction in energy intake was sustained over the next meal. We argue that the differences in oral processing characteristics produced by the hardness of the foods explain the effect on intake. The sustained reduction in energy intake suggests that changes in food texture can be a helpful tool in reducing the overall daily energy intake.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere93370
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • bite size
  • young-adults
  • eating rate
  • weight
  • obesity
  • satiation
  • appetite
  • meal
  • men
  • viscosity

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