Simulating soil erosion risk for Pan-European land use and climate scenarios

S. Mantel, M. Kirby, J. Daroussin, R.J.A. Jones

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Abstract

Soil is a vital resource with multiple functions and with high regional and internal variability. Accelerated soil erosion is a cause for decline in soil quality and is increasingly being recognized as a serious environmental problem. Soil erosion is a function of factors such as: land use and management, rainfall intensity, soil stability and resistance, slope. The Pan-European Soil Erosion Risk Assessment (PESERA) developed and calibrated a process-based and spatial model to quantify soil erosion by water and assess its risk across Europe (Kirkby, M. & Irvine, B., 2001). The model predicts erosion based on simulating overland runoff and estimation of a stabilized vegetation cover. The emphasis of the PESERA erosion model is the prediction of hillslope erosion and channel processes are not considered. Sediment yield is estimated from the number of days per month. The main data sources are: 1) the MARS meteorological database, 2) the European Soils Database, and 3) the GTOPO30 European Digital Elevation Model. Erosion is assumed to occur when rainfall exceeds the weighted mean surface storage of the stabilized ground cover. PESERA is used to predict possible effects of future changes in land use and climate across Europe through scenario analyses. The PESERA model was run on climate change scenarios derived from a regional Climate Model (RCM) developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research based on the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios) framework (Hadley Centre, 1998). The PESERA model provides policy makers with a regional soil erosion indicator. It allows quantifying and monitoring changes due to proposed or implemented policies such as CAP (Common Agricultural Policy), and as a consequence of climate and land use changes.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFraming land use dynamics: international conference 16-18 April 2003, Utrecht, The Netherlands
EditorsM. Dijst, P. Schot, K. de Jong
Place of PublicationUtrecht
PublisherFaculty of Geographical Sciences, Utrecht University
Pages213
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

soil erosion
land use
climate
risk assessment
erosion
Common Agricultural Policy
climate prediction
ground cover
sediment yield
precipitation intensity
hillslope
soil quality
regional climate
land management
vegetation cover
land use change
digital elevation model
climate modeling
soil
runoff

Cite this

Mantel, S., Kirby, M., Daroussin, J., & Jones, R. J. A. (2003). Simulating soil erosion risk for Pan-European land use and climate scenarios. In M. Dijst, P. Schot, & K. de Jong (Eds.), Framing land use dynamics: international conference 16-18 April 2003, Utrecht, The Netherlands (pp. 213). Utrecht: Faculty of Geographical Sciences, Utrecht University.
Mantel, S. ; Kirby, M. ; Daroussin, J. ; Jones, R.J.A. / Simulating soil erosion risk for Pan-European land use and climate scenarios. Framing land use dynamics: international conference 16-18 April 2003, Utrecht, The Netherlands. editor / M. Dijst ; P. Schot ; K. de Jong. Utrecht : Faculty of Geographical Sciences, Utrecht University, 2003. pp. 213
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abstract = "Soil is a vital resource with multiple functions and with high regional and internal variability. Accelerated soil erosion is a cause for decline in soil quality and is increasingly being recognized as a serious environmental problem. Soil erosion is a function of factors such as: land use and management, rainfall intensity, soil stability and resistance, slope. The Pan-European Soil Erosion Risk Assessment (PESERA) developed and calibrated a process-based and spatial model to quantify soil erosion by water and assess its risk across Europe (Kirkby, M. & Irvine, B., 2001). The model predicts erosion based on simulating overland runoff and estimation of a stabilized vegetation cover. The emphasis of the PESERA erosion model is the prediction of hillslope erosion and channel processes are not considered. Sediment yield is estimated from the number of days per month. The main data sources are: 1) the MARS meteorological database, 2) the European Soils Database, and 3) the GTOPO30 European Digital Elevation Model. Erosion is assumed to occur when rainfall exceeds the weighted mean surface storage of the stabilized ground cover. PESERA is used to predict possible effects of future changes in land use and climate across Europe through scenario analyses. The PESERA model was run on climate change scenarios derived from a regional Climate Model (RCM) developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research based on the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios) framework (Hadley Centre, 1998). The PESERA model provides policy makers with a regional soil erosion indicator. It allows quantifying and monitoring changes due to proposed or implemented policies such as CAP (Common Agricultural Policy), and as a consequence of climate and land use changes.",
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Mantel, S, Kirby, M, Daroussin, J & Jones, RJA 2003, Simulating soil erosion risk for Pan-European land use and climate scenarios. in M Dijst, P Schot & K de Jong (eds), Framing land use dynamics: international conference 16-18 April 2003, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Faculty of Geographical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, pp. 213.

Simulating soil erosion risk for Pan-European land use and climate scenarios. / Mantel, S.; Kirby, M.; Daroussin, J.; Jones, R.J.A.

Framing land use dynamics: international conference 16-18 April 2003, Utrecht, The Netherlands. ed. / M. Dijst; P. Schot; K. de Jong. Utrecht : Faculty of Geographical Sciences, Utrecht University, 2003. p. 213.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

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N2 - Soil is a vital resource with multiple functions and with high regional and internal variability. Accelerated soil erosion is a cause for decline in soil quality and is increasingly being recognized as a serious environmental problem. Soil erosion is a function of factors such as: land use and management, rainfall intensity, soil stability and resistance, slope. The Pan-European Soil Erosion Risk Assessment (PESERA) developed and calibrated a process-based and spatial model to quantify soil erosion by water and assess its risk across Europe (Kirkby, M. & Irvine, B., 2001). The model predicts erosion based on simulating overland runoff and estimation of a stabilized vegetation cover. The emphasis of the PESERA erosion model is the prediction of hillslope erosion and channel processes are not considered. Sediment yield is estimated from the number of days per month. The main data sources are: 1) the MARS meteorological database, 2) the European Soils Database, and 3) the GTOPO30 European Digital Elevation Model. Erosion is assumed to occur when rainfall exceeds the weighted mean surface storage of the stabilized ground cover. PESERA is used to predict possible effects of future changes in land use and climate across Europe through scenario analyses. The PESERA model was run on climate change scenarios derived from a regional Climate Model (RCM) developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research based on the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios) framework (Hadley Centre, 1998). The PESERA model provides policy makers with a regional soil erosion indicator. It allows quantifying and monitoring changes due to proposed or implemented policies such as CAP (Common Agricultural Policy), and as a consequence of climate and land use changes.

AB - Soil is a vital resource with multiple functions and with high regional and internal variability. Accelerated soil erosion is a cause for decline in soil quality and is increasingly being recognized as a serious environmental problem. Soil erosion is a function of factors such as: land use and management, rainfall intensity, soil stability and resistance, slope. The Pan-European Soil Erosion Risk Assessment (PESERA) developed and calibrated a process-based and spatial model to quantify soil erosion by water and assess its risk across Europe (Kirkby, M. & Irvine, B., 2001). The model predicts erosion based on simulating overland runoff and estimation of a stabilized vegetation cover. The emphasis of the PESERA erosion model is the prediction of hillslope erosion and channel processes are not considered. Sediment yield is estimated from the number of days per month. The main data sources are: 1) the MARS meteorological database, 2) the European Soils Database, and 3) the GTOPO30 European Digital Elevation Model. Erosion is assumed to occur when rainfall exceeds the weighted mean surface storage of the stabilized ground cover. PESERA is used to predict possible effects of future changes in land use and climate across Europe through scenario analyses. The PESERA model was run on climate change scenarios derived from a regional Climate Model (RCM) developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research based on the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios) framework (Hadley Centre, 1998). The PESERA model provides policy makers with a regional soil erosion indicator. It allows quantifying and monitoring changes due to proposed or implemented policies such as CAP (Common Agricultural Policy), and as a consequence of climate and land use changes.

M3 - Conference paper

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BT - Framing land use dynamics: international conference 16-18 April 2003, Utrecht, The Netherlands

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A2 - de Jong, K.

PB - Faculty of Geographical Sciences, Utrecht University

CY - Utrecht

ER -

Mantel S, Kirby M, Daroussin J, Jones RJA. Simulating soil erosion risk for Pan-European land use and climate scenarios. In Dijst M, Schot P, de Jong K, editors, Framing land use dynamics: international conference 16-18 April 2003, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Utrecht: Faculty of Geographical Sciences, Utrecht University. 2003. p. 213