Short lifespans of memory T-cells in bone marrow, blood, and lymph nodes suggest that T-cell memory is maintained by continuous self-renewal of recirculating cells

Mariona Baliu-Piqué, Myrddin W. Verheij, Julia Drylewicz, Lars Ravesloot, Rob J. de Boer, Ad Koets, Kiki Tesselaar, José A.M. Borghans*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Memory T-cells are essential to maintain long-term immunological memory. It is widely thought that the bone marrow (BM) plays an important role in the long-term maintenance of memory T-cells. There is controversy however on the longevity and recirculating kinetics of BM memory T-cells. While some have proposed that the BM is a reservoir for long-lived, non-circulating memory T-cells, it has also been suggested to be the preferential site for memory T-cell self-renewal. In this study, we used in vivo deuterium labeling in goats to simultaneously quantify the average turnover rates-and thereby expected lifespans-of memory T-cells from BM, blood and lymph nodes (LN). While the fraction of Ki-67 positive cells, a snapshot marker for recent cell division, was higher in memory T-cells from blood compared to BM and LN, in vivo deuterium labeling revealed no substantial differences in the expected lifespans of memory T-cells between these compartments. Our results support the view that the majority of memory T-cells in the BM are self-renewing as fast as those in the periphery, and are continuously recirculating between the blood, BM, and LN.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2054
JournalFrontiers in Immunology
Volume9
Issue numberSEP
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Sep 2018

Keywords

  • Bone marrow
  • Deuterium
  • Lifespan
  • Lymphocyte turnover
  • Mathematical modeling
  • Memory T-cells
  • Stable isotope labeling

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