Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota

Annemarie Baars*, Annemarie Oosting, Mirjam Lohuis, Martijn Koehorst, Sahar El Aidy, Floor Hugenholtz, Hauke Smidt, Mona Mischke, Mark V. Boekschoten, Henkjan J. Verkade, Johan Garssen, Eline M. van der Beek, Jan Knol, Paul de Vos, Jeroen van Bergenhenegouwen, Floris Fransen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physiological processes are differentially regulated between men and women. Sex and gut microbiota have each been demonstrated to regulate host metabolism, but it is unclear whether both factors are interdependent. Here, we determined to what extent sex-specific differences in lipid metabolism are modulated via the gut microbiota. While male and female Conv mice showed predominantly differential expression in gene sets related to lipid metabolism, GF mice showed differences in gene sets linked to gut health and inflammatory responses. This suggests that presence of the gut microbiota is important in sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. Further, we explored the role of bile acids as mediators in the cross-talk between the microbiome and host lipid metabolism. Females showed higher total and primary serum bile acids levels, independent of presence of microbiota. However, in presence of microbiota we observed higher secondary serum bile acid levels in females compared to males. Analysis of microbiota composition displayed sex-specific differences in Conv mice. Therefore, our data suggests that bile acids possibly play a role in the crosstalk between the microbiome and sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our data shows that presence of the gut microbiota contributes to sex differences in lipid metabolism.

Original languageEnglish
Article number13426
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Lipid Metabolism
Sex Characteristics
Microbiota
Bile Acids and Salts
Physiological Phenomena
Serum
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Gene Expression
Health
Genes

Cite this

Baars, A., Oosting, A., Lohuis, M., Koehorst, M., El Aidy, S., Hugenholtz, F., ... Fransen, F. (2018). Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota. Scientific Reports, 8(1), [13426]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31695-w
Baars, Annemarie ; Oosting, Annemarie ; Lohuis, Mirjam ; Koehorst, Martijn ; El Aidy, Sahar ; Hugenholtz, Floor ; Smidt, Hauke ; Mischke, Mona ; Boekschoten, Mark V. ; Verkade, Henkjan J. ; Garssen, Johan ; van der Beek, Eline M. ; Knol, Jan ; de Vos, Paul ; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen ; Fransen, Floris. / Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
@article{2c2c567551be442996d9619331bd7233,
title = "Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota",
abstract = "Physiological processes are differentially regulated between men and women. Sex and gut microbiota have each been demonstrated to regulate host metabolism, but it is unclear whether both factors are interdependent. Here, we determined to what extent sex-specific differences in lipid metabolism are modulated via the gut microbiota. While male and female Conv mice showed predominantly differential expression in gene sets related to lipid metabolism, GF mice showed differences in gene sets linked to gut health and inflammatory responses. This suggests that presence of the gut microbiota is important in sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. Further, we explored the role of bile acids as mediators in the cross-talk between the microbiome and host lipid metabolism. Females showed higher total and primary serum bile acids levels, independent of presence of microbiota. However, in presence of microbiota we observed higher secondary serum bile acid levels in females compared to males. Analysis of microbiota composition displayed sex-specific differences in Conv mice. Therefore, our data suggests that bile acids possibly play a role in the crosstalk between the microbiome and sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our data shows that presence of the gut microbiota contributes to sex differences in lipid metabolism.",
author = "Annemarie Baars and Annemarie Oosting and Mirjam Lohuis and Martijn Koehorst and {El Aidy}, Sahar and Floor Hugenholtz and Hauke Smidt and Mona Mischke and Boekschoten, {Mark V.} and Verkade, {Henkjan J.} and Johan Garssen and {van der Beek}, {Eline M.} and Jan Knol and {de Vos}, Paul and {van Bergenhenegouwen}, Jeroen and Floris Fransen",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-018-31695-w",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

Baars, A, Oosting, A, Lohuis, M, Koehorst, M, El Aidy, S, Hugenholtz, F, Smidt, H, Mischke, M, Boekschoten, MV, Verkade, HJ, Garssen, J, van der Beek, EM, Knol, J, de Vos, P, van Bergenhenegouwen, J & Fransen, F 2018, 'Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota', Scientific Reports, vol. 8, no. 1, 13426. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31695-w

Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota. / Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Lohuis, Mirjam; Koehorst, Martijn; El Aidy, Sahar; Hugenholtz, Floor; Smidt, Hauke; Mischke, Mona; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Garssen, Johan; van der Beek, Eline M.; Knol, Jan; de Vos, Paul; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Fransen, Floris.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 13426, 01.09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota

AU - Baars, Annemarie

AU - Oosting, Annemarie

AU - Lohuis, Mirjam

AU - Koehorst, Martijn

AU - El Aidy, Sahar

AU - Hugenholtz, Floor

AU - Smidt, Hauke

AU - Mischke, Mona

AU - Boekschoten, Mark V.

AU - Verkade, Henkjan J.

AU - Garssen, Johan

AU - van der Beek, Eline M.

AU - Knol, Jan

AU - de Vos, Paul

AU - van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen

AU - Fransen, Floris

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Physiological processes are differentially regulated between men and women. Sex and gut microbiota have each been demonstrated to regulate host metabolism, but it is unclear whether both factors are interdependent. Here, we determined to what extent sex-specific differences in lipid metabolism are modulated via the gut microbiota. While male and female Conv mice showed predominantly differential expression in gene sets related to lipid metabolism, GF mice showed differences in gene sets linked to gut health and inflammatory responses. This suggests that presence of the gut microbiota is important in sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. Further, we explored the role of bile acids as mediators in the cross-talk between the microbiome and host lipid metabolism. Females showed higher total and primary serum bile acids levels, independent of presence of microbiota. However, in presence of microbiota we observed higher secondary serum bile acid levels in females compared to males. Analysis of microbiota composition displayed sex-specific differences in Conv mice. Therefore, our data suggests that bile acids possibly play a role in the crosstalk between the microbiome and sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our data shows that presence of the gut microbiota contributes to sex differences in lipid metabolism.

AB - Physiological processes are differentially regulated between men and women. Sex and gut microbiota have each been demonstrated to regulate host metabolism, but it is unclear whether both factors are interdependent. Here, we determined to what extent sex-specific differences in lipid metabolism are modulated via the gut microbiota. While male and female Conv mice showed predominantly differential expression in gene sets related to lipid metabolism, GF mice showed differences in gene sets linked to gut health and inflammatory responses. This suggests that presence of the gut microbiota is important in sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. Further, we explored the role of bile acids as mediators in the cross-talk between the microbiome and host lipid metabolism. Females showed higher total and primary serum bile acids levels, independent of presence of microbiota. However, in presence of microbiota we observed higher secondary serum bile acid levels in females compared to males. Analysis of microbiota composition displayed sex-specific differences in Conv mice. Therefore, our data suggests that bile acids possibly play a role in the crosstalk between the microbiome and sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our data shows that presence of the gut microbiota contributes to sex differences in lipid metabolism.

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-018-31695-w

DO - 10.1038/s41598-018-31695-w

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

M1 - 13426

ER -

Baars A, Oosting A, Lohuis M, Koehorst M, El Aidy S, Hugenholtz F et al. Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota. Scientific Reports. 2018 Sep 1;8(1). 13426. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31695-w