Sensory correlation of glucose levels in a starch-based semi-solid model system before and after alpha-amylase breakdown

J.F. Prinz, R.A. de Wijk

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    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this study a diabetic glucose monitor was used to measure the glucose content of 40 model vanilla custard desserts, these were compared with sensory ratings from a trained quantitative descriptive analysis panel. Stimuli varied in starch type, concentration and homogenisation but had identical sugar, flavour and fat contents. Despite this, mean sensory ratings of sweetness varied from 21 to 43 on a 100-point scale. Glucose levels in the stimuli were measured, in vitro, before and after the addition of 0.1% whole human saliva to the product. In all cases glucose concentration increased after the addition of saliva as starch was converted to glucose. There were highly significant correlations of some odour, flavour, mouth feel and after-feel attributes with glucose concentration. The correlation of sweet flavour with glucose concentration was higher in unmodified stimuli than in stimuli with added saliva, suggesting that sweetness is perceived soon after ingestion. Additional glucose produced through starch breakdown appeared to have a relatively small impact on the sensory scores of the stimuli.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)168-172
    JournalArchives of Oral Biology
    Volume52
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

    Keywords

    • custard desserts
    • texture

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