Selection for immunoresponsiveness in chickens : effects of the major histocompatibility complex and resistance to Marek's disease

M.H. Pinard

    Research output: Thesisexternal PhD, WU

    Abstract

    <p>Improving genetic disease resistance may be an attractive preventive measure in the control of infectious diseases in livestock production. Chickens were selected for high and low antibody response to sheep red blood cells for ten generations. Divergent selection was successfully achieved and led to changes in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) type distribution. Effects of MHC on the selected trait were subsequently assessed in the selected lines and in a F2. The low line was more susceptible to Marek's disease than the control line, but the high line was not more resistant than the control line. MHC types showed also significant effects on resistance to Marek's disease. Both antibody response and resistance to Marek's disease showed high heritabilities and effects of MHC but it could not be established whether disease resistance may be improved by selection for antibody response only.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Noordhuizen, J.P.T.M., Promotor, External person
    • van der Zijpp, A.J., Promotor
    Award date29 Sep 1992
    Place of PublicationS.l.
    Publisher
    Print ISBNs9789054850281
    Publication statusPublished - 1992

    Keywords

    • poultry
    • fowls
    • veterinary science
    • marek's disease
    • aujeszky's disease
    • immunity
    • immunology
    • immune system
    • improvement
    • resistance
    • animal breeding

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