Secondary succession and indigenous management in semideciduous forest fallows of the Amazon basin

M. Toledo, J. Salick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To the discussion on secondary succession in tropical forests, we bring data on three under-addressed issues: understory as well as overstory changes, continuous as opposed to phase changes, and integration of forest succession with indigenous fallow management and plant uses. Changes in vegetation structure and species composition were analyzed in secondary forests following swidden agriculture in a semideciduous forest of Bolivian lowlands. Twenty-eight fallows, stratified by four successional stages (early = 1¿5 yr, intermediate = 6¿10 yr, advanced = 12¿20 yr, and older = 22¿36 yr), and ten stands of mature forests were sampled. The overstory (plants ¿5 cm diameter at breast height [DBH]) was sampled using a 20 × 50 m plot and the understory (plants
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-170
JournalBiotropica
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • peruvian amazon
  • old-growth
  • costa-rica
  • ethnobotany
  • vegetation

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