Scale frame interaction patterns in the Dutch debate on the future of intensive cattle breeding

M. van Lieshout, A. Dewulf

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Abstract Scale frame interaction patterns in the Dutch debate on the future of intensive cattle breeding A starting point of this study is the fact that complex decision making processes often exceed (administrative) scales and levels, whereas actors and organizations are usually bound to a certain scale and level. This raises difficulties and indistinctness for example regarding responsibilities and accountability. Since clear responsibilities and accountability are essential to bring complex, scale-transcending processes to a good closure, we study: which interaction patterns actors use to negotiate the responsible scale and level. In this paper we study scales as social constructions. Scales are not just out there as fixed entities with an unequivocal meaning. Through the process of framing, actors highlight different aspects of a situation as relevant, problematic or urgent, and by doing so situate issues on different levels and scales. Framing refers to the interpretation process through which people construct and express how they make sense of the world around them. We use the term ‘scale framing’, with which we mean the process of framing a phenomenon on a certain scale and/or level. Presently in the Netherlands a debate about the future of the intensive agriculture is going on. We take this debate as an example of a complex decision making process in which responsibilities are undefined. The process is complex, since many interests and interdependencies on different scales and levels are involved. Taking this debate as casus, the data for our analysis consist of recordings of several discussions about the future of Dutch intensive cattle breeding in different settings. We use a discursive approach to framing to analyze the different scale frames and related interaction patterns, actors in discussion bring to the fore. These interaction patterns provide insights in the negotiation of taking and shifting responsibilities and as such can contribute to the settlement of deadlocked decision making processes.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventScaling and Governance Conference 2010 - Wageningen, Netherlands
Duration: 10 Nov 201012 Nov 2010

Conference

ConferenceScaling and Governance Conference 2010
CountryNetherlands
CityWageningen
Period10/11/1012/11/10

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    van Lieshout, M., & Dewulf, A. (2010). Scale frame interaction patterns in the Dutch debate on the future of intensive cattle breeding. Abstract from Scaling and Governance Conference 2010, Wageningen, Netherlands.