Sampling method, storage and pretreatment of sediment affect AVS concentrations with consequences for bioassay responses

H.J. de Lange, C. van Griethuysen, A.A. Koelmans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sediment treatment and sediment storage may alter sediment toxicity, and consequently biotic response. Purpose of our study was to combine these three aspects (treatment-toxicity-biotic response) in one integrated approach. We used Acid Volatile Sulfide (AVS) concentrations as a proxy of the disturbance of the sediment. AVS and Simultaneously Extracted Metal (SEM) concentrations were compared to bioassay responses with the freshwater benthic macroinvertebrate Asellus aquaticus. Storage conditions and sediment treatment affected AVS but not SEM levels. AVS can be used as a proxy for sediment disturbance. The best way to pretreat the sediment for use in a bioassay in order to maintain initial AVS conditions was to sample the sediment with an Ekman grab, immediately store it in a jar without headspace, and freeze it as soon as possible. In a survey using seven different sediments, bioassay responses of A. aquaticus were correlated with SEM and AVS characteristics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-251
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume151
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • acid-volatile sulfide
  • fresh-water sediments
  • floodplain lake-sediments
  • rhine-meuse delta
  • macroinvertebrate community
  • asellus-aquaticus
  • benthic invertebrates
  • chironomus-riparius
  • trace-metals
  • toxicity

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