Salt inactivation of classical swine fever virus and African swine fever virus in porcine intestines confirms the existing in vitro casings model

Tinka Jelsma*, Joris J. Wijnker, Bregtje Smid, Eline Verheij, Wim H.M. van der Poel, Henk J. Wisselink

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Natural casings, to be used as sausage containers, are being traded worldwide and may be contaminated with contagious viruses. Standard processing of such natural casings is by salt treatment with a duration of 30 days before shipment. Since information is lacking about the efficacy of these virus inactivation procedures, an in vitro 3D collagen matrix model, mimicking natural casings, was developed previously to determine the efficacy of salt to inactivate specific viruses. To validate this model, a comparison in vivo experiment was performed using intestines of pigs experimentally infected with African swine fever virus (ASFV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Decimal reduction (D) values, were determined at 4 °C, 12 °C, 20 °C and 25 °C. The standard salt processing procedure showed an efficient inactivation of ASFV and CSFV over time in a temperature dependent way. Dintestine values of both viruses, treated with the standard salt treatment, were in line with the Dcollagen values. It was concluded that these results underline the suitability of the 3D collagen matrix model to determine virus inactivation and to replace animal experiments. Furthermore, an increase in storage time for standard salt processed casings derived from CSFV endemic regions is highly recommended for an efficient inactivation of CSFV.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108424
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume238
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

Keywords

  • 3D collagen matrix model
  • African swine fever
  • Classical swine fever
  • D-values
  • Intestine
  • Virus inactivation

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