Rumen odd and branched chain fatty acids in relation to in vitro rumen volatile fatty acid productions and dietary characteristics of incubated substrates

B. Vlaeminck, V. Fievez, H. van Laar, D. Demeyer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    41 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A first aim of this batch in vitro experiment (21 h) was to use changes in odd and branched chain fatty acid (OBCFA) patterns to suggest shifts in microbial populations, associated with four types of incubated whole dairy cow diets. Principal component analysis suggested higher dietary starch increased the proportion of C15:0 and C17:0, whereas increased neutral detergent fibre content was positively related to anteiso C15:0 concentrations, which is in agreement with the importance of these fatty acids in respectively amylolytic and cellulolytic bacteria. A second aim of the experiment was to relate rumen volatile fatty acid proportions to OBCFA by principal component regression and to compare these relations with predictions based on diet proximate composition. The R2 values achieved for the regressions between acetate, propionate and butyrate, and OBCFA were 79.6%, 86.6% and 84.9% respectively. Moreover, in the current study, predictions of the rumen fermentation pattern showed higher R2 (p <0.01) when based on OBCFA compared with proximate feed composition. If relations persist in vivo, there could be scope for milk OBCFA to predict the supply of specific rumen nutrients.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)401-411
    JournalJournal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition
    Volume88
    Issue number11-12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Keywords

    • lipid-metabolism
    • dairy-cows
    • fish oils
    • bacteria
    • biohydrogenation
    • fermentation
    • microflora
    • roughage
    • invitro
    • milk

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Rumen odd and branched chain fatty acids in relation to in vitro rumen volatile fatty acid productions and dietary characteristics of incubated substrates'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this