Rhythms of a Transnational Marriage: Temporal Topologies of Borders in a Knowledge Migrant Family

L.B. Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademic

Abstract

The practices and qualities that constitute a successfully married couple are both difficult to identify, and difficult to embody. Melding two lives into one family requires synchronization of expectations and needs, of communication and understandings, of livelihoods and care. A marriage emerges from both coupled lives, of synchronous affect, and coupled livelihoods, of becoming a solvent household unit. Cross-border mobilities complicate these processes. The bureaucratic and institutional definitions of marriage, as well as its emotional and economic dimen- sions, are often difficult to reconfigure when border crossings are implicit in sustaining the marriage. Using a co-autoethnographic example of how these three rhythms of marriage – coupled life, coupled livelihood, and bureaucratic mobility – intertwine, sometimes destabilizing each other, this paper documents how the cacophony of these rhythms can create topological impediments that border (Mezzadra and Neilson 2012), in both space but especially in time, within our marriage.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-105
Number of pages25
JournalEtnofoor : anthropological journal
Volume26
Issue numberJuly 2014
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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