Rhizoctonia solani disease suppression: addition of keratin-rich soil amendment leads to functional shifts in soil microbial communities

Lina Russ*, Beatriz Andreo Jimenez, Els Nijhuis, Joeke Postma

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Promoting soil suppressiveness against soil borne pathogens could be a promising strategy to manage crop diseases. One way to increase the suppression potential in agricultural soils is via the addition of organic amendments. This microbe-mediated phenomenon, although not fully understood, prompted our study to explore the microbial taxa and functional properties associated with Rhizoctonia solani disease suppression in sugar beet seedlings after amending soil with a keratin-rich waste stream. Soil samples were analyzed using shotgun metagenomics sequencing. Results showed that both amended soils were enriched in bacterial families found in disease suppressive soils before, indicating that the amendment of keratin-rich material can support the transformation into a suppressive soil. On a functional level, genes encoding keratinolytic enzymes were found to be abundant in the keratin-amended samples. Proteins enriched in amended soils were those potentially involved in the production of secondary metabolites/antibiotics, motility, keratin-degradation, and contractile secretion system proteins. We hypothesize these taxa contribute to the amendment-induced suppression effect due to their genomic potential to produce antibiotics, secrete effectors via the contractile secretion system, and degrade oxalate - a potential virulence factor of R. solani - while simultaneously possessing the ability to metabolize keratin.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberfiae024
JournalFEMS Microbiology Ecology
Volume100
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

Keywords

  • disease suppression
  • keratin
  • microbiome
  • Rhizoctonia solani
  • soil

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