Revisiting the Role of Master Regulators in Tomato Ripening

Rufang Wang, Gerco C. Angenent, Graham Seymour, Ruud A. de Maagd*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The study of transcriptional regulation of tomato ripening has been led by spontaneous mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes that completely inhibit normal ripening, suggesting that they are ‘master regulators’. Studies using CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis to produce knockouts of the underlying genes indicate a different picture, suggesting that the regulation is more robust than previously thought. This requires us to revisit our model of the regulation of ripening and replace it with one involving a network of partially redundant components. At the same time, the fast rise of CRISPR/Cas mutagenesis, resulting in unexpectedly weak phenotypes, compared with knockdown technology, suggests that compensatory mechanisms may obscure protein functions. This emphasises the need for assessment of these mechanisms in plants and for the careful design of mutagenesis experiments.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTrends in Plant Science
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Jan 2020

Fingerprint

mutagenesis
ripening
tomatoes
needs assessment
gene targeting
transcription factors
mutation
phenotype
genes
proteins

Keywords

  • CRISPR- mutagenesis
  • gain-of-function
  • mutants
  • ripening
  • tomato
  • transcription factors

Cite this

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title = "Revisiting the Role of Master Regulators in Tomato Ripening",
abstract = "The study of transcriptional regulation of tomato ripening has been led by spontaneous mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes that completely inhibit normal ripening, suggesting that they are ‘master regulators’. Studies using CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis to produce knockouts of the underlying genes indicate a different picture, suggesting that the regulation is more robust than previously thought. This requires us to revisit our model of the regulation of ripening and replace it with one involving a network of partially redundant components. At the same time, the fast rise of CRISPR/Cas mutagenesis, resulting in unexpectedly weak phenotypes, compared with knockdown technology, suggests that compensatory mechanisms may obscure protein functions. This emphasises the need for assessment of these mechanisms in plants and for the careful design of mutagenesis experiments.",
keywords = "CRISPR- mutagenesis, gain-of-function, mutants, ripening, tomato, transcription factors",
author = "Rufang Wang and Angenent, {Gerco C.} and Graham Seymour and {de Maagd}, {Ruud A.}",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
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Revisiting the Role of Master Regulators in Tomato Ripening. / Wang, Rufang; Angenent, Gerco C.; Seymour, Graham; de Maagd, Ruud A.

In: Trends in Plant Science, 08.01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Revisiting the Role of Master Regulators in Tomato Ripening

AU - Wang, Rufang

AU - Angenent, Gerco C.

AU - Seymour, Graham

AU - de Maagd, Ruud A.

PY - 2020/1/8

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N2 - The study of transcriptional regulation of tomato ripening has been led by spontaneous mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes that completely inhibit normal ripening, suggesting that they are ‘master regulators’. Studies using CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis to produce knockouts of the underlying genes indicate a different picture, suggesting that the regulation is more robust than previously thought. This requires us to revisit our model of the regulation of ripening and replace it with one involving a network of partially redundant components. At the same time, the fast rise of CRISPR/Cas mutagenesis, resulting in unexpectedly weak phenotypes, compared with knockdown technology, suggests that compensatory mechanisms may obscure protein functions. This emphasises the need for assessment of these mechanisms in plants and for the careful design of mutagenesis experiments.

AB - The study of transcriptional regulation of tomato ripening has been led by spontaneous mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes that completely inhibit normal ripening, suggesting that they are ‘master regulators’. Studies using CRISPR/Cas9 mutagenesis to produce knockouts of the underlying genes indicate a different picture, suggesting that the regulation is more robust than previously thought. This requires us to revisit our model of the regulation of ripening and replace it with one involving a network of partially redundant components. At the same time, the fast rise of CRISPR/Cas mutagenesis, resulting in unexpectedly weak phenotypes, compared with knockdown technology, suggests that compensatory mechanisms may obscure protein functions. This emphasises the need for assessment of these mechanisms in plants and for the careful design of mutagenesis experiments.

KW - CRISPR- mutagenesis

KW - gain-of-function

KW - mutants

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KW - transcription factors

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