Response to Comment on “Modeling Maximum Adsorption Capacities of Soot and Soot-like Materials for PAHs and PCBs”

P.C.M. van Noort, M.T.O. Jonker, A.A. Koelmans

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterAcademic

Abstract

A comment by John C. Fetzer on modeling maximum adsorption capacities of soot and soot-like materials for PAH and PCB and the adsorption behavior of PAH on soots and on other adsorptive materials is presented. The authors (van Noort et al.) base their model on van der Waal's forces only. This may be a valid assumption for bioavailable PAH. These weak forces allow extraction by rain or surface water, and the equilibria are solubility limited. The PAH adsorb more strongly than just due to van der Waal's forces through the interactions of the ¿ electrons with those of the partially graphitic structures in soots and other solid combustion products. In the paper by Fetzer and Rechsteiner, they looked at soots, carbon blacks, and diesel particulate. Fetzer later work on fullerene-rich soots and other materials. There is no absolute definable level of total PAH. The solvent sequence used was dichloromethane, chlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, with hexane as a starting solvent for some types of samples. The defined PAH in many materials, including standard reference materials, is defined by desorption conditions. A response to the comment by van Noort et al. is also presented. They doubt the theory of Fetzer that "PAH adsorb more strongly than just due to van der Waal's forces through the interactions of the ¿ electrons with those of the partially graphitic structures in soots and other solid combustion products". In fact this may not be the case as it has been shown that adsorption of aromatic compounds onto carbon surfaces can be quantitatively described on the basis of van der Waals interactions only. The comments illustrate that further work is needed on both the molecular characterization of adsorption on carbon surfaces and on the morphological characteristics of carbon sorbents influencing this sorption.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)383-384
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Soot
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
soot
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
PCB
PAH
adsorption
Adsorption
Van der Waals forces
modeling
Carbon
carbon
combustion
fullerene
electron
chlorobenzene
Fullerenes
black carbon
material
Electrons

Keywords

  • sorption
  • carbon

Cite this

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title = "Response to Comment on “Modeling Maximum Adsorption Capacities of Soot and Soot-like Materials for PAHs and PCBs”",
abstract = "A comment by John C. Fetzer on modeling maximum adsorption capacities of soot and soot-like materials for PAH and PCB and the adsorption behavior of PAH on soots and on other adsorptive materials is presented. The authors (van Noort et al.) base their model on van der Waal's forces only. This may be a valid assumption for bioavailable PAH. These weak forces allow extraction by rain or surface water, and the equilibria are solubility limited. The PAH adsorb more strongly than just due to van der Waal's forces through the interactions of the ¿ electrons with those of the partially graphitic structures in soots and other solid combustion products. In the paper by Fetzer and Rechsteiner, they looked at soots, carbon blacks, and diesel particulate. Fetzer later work on fullerene-rich soots and other materials. There is no absolute definable level of total PAH. The solvent sequence used was dichloromethane, chlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, with hexane as a starting solvent for some types of samples. The defined PAH in many materials, including standard reference materials, is defined by desorption conditions. A response to the comment by van Noort et al. is also presented. They doubt the theory of Fetzer that {"}PAH adsorb more strongly than just due to van der Waal's forces through the interactions of the ¿ electrons with those of the partially graphitic structures in soots and other solid combustion products{"}. In fact this may not be the case as it has been shown that adsorption of aromatic compounds onto carbon surfaces can be quantitatively described on the basis of van der Waals interactions only. The comments illustrate that further work is needed on both the molecular characterization of adsorption on carbon surfaces and on the morphological characteristics of carbon sorbents influencing this sorption.",
keywords = "sorption, carbon",
author = "{van Noort}, P.C.M. and M.T.O. Jonker and A.A. Koelmans",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1021/es040538v",
language = "English",
volume = "39",
pages = "383--384",
journal = "Environmental Science and Technology",
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publisher = "American Chemical Society",
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}

Response to Comment on “Modeling Maximum Adsorption Capacities of Soot and Soot-like Materials for PAHs and PCBs”. / van Noort, P.C.M.; Jonker, M.T.O.; Koelmans, A.A.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 39, No. 1, 2005, p. 383-384.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterAcademic

TY - JOUR

T1 - Response to Comment on “Modeling Maximum Adsorption Capacities of Soot and Soot-like Materials for PAHs and PCBs”

AU - van Noort, P.C.M.

AU - Jonker, M.T.O.

AU - Koelmans, A.A.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - A comment by John C. Fetzer on modeling maximum adsorption capacities of soot and soot-like materials for PAH and PCB and the adsorption behavior of PAH on soots and on other adsorptive materials is presented. The authors (van Noort et al.) base their model on van der Waal's forces only. This may be a valid assumption for bioavailable PAH. These weak forces allow extraction by rain or surface water, and the equilibria are solubility limited. The PAH adsorb more strongly than just due to van der Waal's forces through the interactions of the ¿ electrons with those of the partially graphitic structures in soots and other solid combustion products. In the paper by Fetzer and Rechsteiner, they looked at soots, carbon blacks, and diesel particulate. Fetzer later work on fullerene-rich soots and other materials. There is no absolute definable level of total PAH. The solvent sequence used was dichloromethane, chlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, with hexane as a starting solvent for some types of samples. The defined PAH in many materials, including standard reference materials, is defined by desorption conditions. A response to the comment by van Noort et al. is also presented. They doubt the theory of Fetzer that "PAH adsorb more strongly than just due to van der Waal's forces through the interactions of the ¿ electrons with those of the partially graphitic structures in soots and other solid combustion products". In fact this may not be the case as it has been shown that adsorption of aromatic compounds onto carbon surfaces can be quantitatively described on the basis of van der Waals interactions only. The comments illustrate that further work is needed on both the molecular characterization of adsorption on carbon surfaces and on the morphological characteristics of carbon sorbents influencing this sorption.

AB - A comment by John C. Fetzer on modeling maximum adsorption capacities of soot and soot-like materials for PAH and PCB and the adsorption behavior of PAH on soots and on other adsorptive materials is presented. The authors (van Noort et al.) base their model on van der Waal's forces only. This may be a valid assumption for bioavailable PAH. These weak forces allow extraction by rain or surface water, and the equilibria are solubility limited. The PAH adsorb more strongly than just due to van der Waal's forces through the interactions of the ¿ electrons with those of the partially graphitic structures in soots and other solid combustion products. In the paper by Fetzer and Rechsteiner, they looked at soots, carbon blacks, and diesel particulate. Fetzer later work on fullerene-rich soots and other materials. There is no absolute definable level of total PAH. The solvent sequence used was dichloromethane, chlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, with hexane as a starting solvent for some types of samples. The defined PAH in many materials, including standard reference materials, is defined by desorption conditions. A response to the comment by van Noort et al. is also presented. They doubt the theory of Fetzer that "PAH adsorb more strongly than just due to van der Waal's forces through the interactions of the ¿ electrons with those of the partially graphitic structures in soots and other solid combustion products". In fact this may not be the case as it has been shown that adsorption of aromatic compounds onto carbon surfaces can be quantitatively described on the basis of van der Waals interactions only. The comments illustrate that further work is needed on both the molecular characterization of adsorption on carbon surfaces and on the morphological characteristics of carbon sorbents influencing this sorption.

KW - sorption

KW - carbon

U2 - 10.1021/es040538v

DO - 10.1021/es040538v

M3 - Letter

VL - 39

SP - 383

EP - 384

JO - Environmental Science and Technology

JF - Environmental Science and Technology

SN - 0013-936X

IS - 1

ER -