Resilience indicators based on daily milk yield data for genetic selection in dairy cattle

M. Poppe, H.A. Mulder, H. Hogeveen, C. Kamphuis, G. Bonekamp, M.L. van Pelt, E. Mullaart, R.F. Veerkamp

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademic

Abstract

Dairy cows face many kinds of environmental challenges throughout their life, such as pathogens, sudden changes in feed quality, or heat waves. Resilient cows are cows that can cope well with such challenges – they are minimally affected and recover quickly. Having resilient cows is beneficial for both the cows themselves and farmers. We investigated if newly developed traits, based on daily milk yield can be used to genetically select for improved resilience. Cows change their milk yield in response to challenges. The hypothesis was, therefore, that daily patterns in milk yield can indicate resilience. Breeding for low variability in milk yield and for low autocorrelation, i.e. dependency between day-to-day deviations in milk yield, can help to improve resilience. Genetic improvement of resilience will likely improve welfare and profitability of cows, and improve job satisfaction of farmers.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 12th World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production (WCGALP)
Subtitle of host publicationTechnical and species orientated innovations in animal breeding, and contribution of genetics to solving societal challenges
EditorsR.F. Veerkamp, Y. de Haas
Place of PublicationWageningen
PublisherWageningen Academic Publishers
Pages446-449
ISBN (Electronic)9789086869404
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
EventWorld Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production: WCGALP 2022 - Rotterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 3 Jul 20228 Jul 2022

Conference

ConferenceWorld Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production: WCGALP 2022
Country/TerritoryNetherlands
CityRotterdam
Period3/07/228/07/22

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