Phénologie de la reproduction du Vautour charognard Necrosyrtes monachus en zone soudano-sahélienne (Garango, Burkina Faso), 2013–2015

Translated title of the contribution: Reproductive phenology of the Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus in the Sudan-Sahel zone at Garango, Burkina Faso, 2013–2015

Clément Daboné, Adama Oueda, J.B. Adjakpa, R. Buij, I. Ouedraogo, W. Guenda, Peter D.M. Weesie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Twenty nests of the Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus at Garango, east-central Burkina Faso, were regularly visited (mean 16 visits per nest) during the breeding period from 8 October 2013 to 15 May 2014, to determine the reproductive phenology. During the following breeding season (2014–15) 56 nests were studied to confirm the results obtained the previous season. Most nests were re-used old ones. During the 2013–14 breeding season, pairing and nest building were observed from the end of September 2013. The first clutches were observed from 30 October, with most laid in November and December 2013. In the 13 successful nests, hatching occurred after 45–52 days of incubation. Brooding of the 13 young which eventually flew lasted 3–4 months. During the 2014–15 breeding season, the 45 breeding pairs arrived in the breeding area from September 2014, 41 of the 45 clutches were laid before 28 December 2014, 31 of the 37 clutches which hatched did so before 31 January 2015, 26 of the 33 broods which flew did so before 3 May 2015 and the seven others before 20 May. These results confirm in most respects earlier studies in West and East Africa.
Translated title of the contributionReproductive phenology of the Hooded Vulture Necrosyrtes monachus in the Sudan-Sahel zone at Garango, Burkina Faso, 2013–2015
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)38-49
JournalMalimbus
Volume38
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jun 2016

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