Repellent Activities of Essential Oils of Some Plants Used Traditionally to Control the Brown Ear Tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus

W.W. Wanzala, A. Hassanali, W.R. Mukabana, W. Takken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Essential oils of eight plants, selected after an ethnobotanical survey conducted in Bukusu community in Bungoma County, western Kenya (Tagetes minuta, Tithonia diversifolia, Juniperus procera, Solanecio mannii, Senna didymobotrya, Lantana camara, Securidaca longepedunculata, and Hoslundia opposita), were initially screened (at two doses) for their repellence against brown ear tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, using a dual-choice climbing assay. The oils of T. minuta and T. diversifolia were then selected for more detailed study. Dose-response evaluations of these oils showed that T. minuta oil was more repellent (RD50 = 0.0021¿mg) than that of T. diversifolia (RD50 = 0.263¿mg). Gas chromatography-linked mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analyses showed different compositions of the two oils. T. minuta oil is comprised mainly of cis-ocimene (43.78%), dihydrotagetone (16.71%), piperitenone (10.15%), trans-tagetone (8.67%), 3,9-epoxy-p-mentha-1,8(10)diene (6.47%), ß-ocimene (3.25%), and cis-tagetone (1.95%), whereas T. diversifolia oil is comprised mainly of a-pinene (63.64%), ß-pinene (15.00%), isocaryophyllene (7.62%), nerolidol (3.70%), 1-tridecanol (1.75%), limonene (1.52%), and sabinene (1.00%). The results provide scientific rationale for traditional use of raw products of these plants in controlling livestock ticks by the Bukusu community and lay down some groundwork for exploiting partially refined products such as essential oils of these plants in protecting cattle against infestations with R. appendiculatus.
Original languageEnglish
Article number434506
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Parasitology Research
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Rhipicephalus
Ticks
Volatile Oils
Ear
Oils
Securidaca
Tagetes
Lantana
Juniperus
Mentha
Asteraceae
Kenya
Livestock
Gas Chromatography

Cite this

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title = "Repellent Activities of Essential Oils of Some Plants Used Traditionally to Control the Brown Ear Tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus",
abstract = "Essential oils of eight plants, selected after an ethnobotanical survey conducted in Bukusu community in Bungoma County, western Kenya (Tagetes minuta, Tithonia diversifolia, Juniperus procera, Solanecio mannii, Senna didymobotrya, Lantana camara, Securidaca longepedunculata, and Hoslundia opposita), were initially screened (at two doses) for their repellence against brown ear tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, using a dual-choice climbing assay. The oils of T. minuta and T. diversifolia were then selected for more detailed study. Dose-response evaluations of these oils showed that T. minuta oil was more repellent (RD50 = 0.0021¿mg) than that of T. diversifolia (RD50 = 0.263¿mg). Gas chromatography-linked mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analyses showed different compositions of the two oils. T. minuta oil is comprised mainly of cis-ocimene (43.78{\%}), dihydrotagetone (16.71{\%}), piperitenone (10.15{\%}), trans-tagetone (8.67{\%}), 3,9-epoxy-p-mentha-1,8(10)diene (6.47{\%}), {\ss}-ocimene (3.25{\%}), and cis-tagetone (1.95{\%}), whereas T. diversifolia oil is comprised mainly of a-pinene (63.64{\%}), {\ss}-pinene (15.00{\%}), isocaryophyllene (7.62{\%}), nerolidol (3.70{\%}), 1-tridecanol (1.75{\%}), limonene (1.52{\%}), and sabinene (1.00{\%}). The results provide scientific rationale for traditional use of raw products of these plants in controlling livestock ticks by the Bukusu community and lay down some groundwork for exploiting partially refined products such as essential oils of these plants in protecting cattle against infestations with R. appendiculatus.",
author = "W.W. Wanzala and A. Hassanali and W.R. Mukabana and W. Takken",
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Repellent Activities of Essential Oils of Some Plants Used Traditionally to Control the Brown Ear Tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. / Wanzala, W.W.; Hassanali, A.; Mukabana, W.R.; Takken, W.

In: Journal of Parasitology Research, Vol. 2014, 434506, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Repellent Activities of Essential Oils of Some Plants Used Traditionally to Control the Brown Ear Tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus

AU - Wanzala, W.W.

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AU - Takken, W.

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AB - Essential oils of eight plants, selected after an ethnobotanical survey conducted in Bukusu community in Bungoma County, western Kenya (Tagetes minuta, Tithonia diversifolia, Juniperus procera, Solanecio mannii, Senna didymobotrya, Lantana camara, Securidaca longepedunculata, and Hoslundia opposita), were initially screened (at two doses) for their repellence against brown ear tick, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, using a dual-choice climbing assay. The oils of T. minuta and T. diversifolia were then selected for more detailed study. Dose-response evaluations of these oils showed that T. minuta oil was more repellent (RD50 = 0.0021¿mg) than that of T. diversifolia (RD50 = 0.263¿mg). Gas chromatography-linked mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analyses showed different compositions of the two oils. T. minuta oil is comprised mainly of cis-ocimene (43.78%), dihydrotagetone (16.71%), piperitenone (10.15%), trans-tagetone (8.67%), 3,9-epoxy-p-mentha-1,8(10)diene (6.47%), ß-ocimene (3.25%), and cis-tagetone (1.95%), whereas T. diversifolia oil is comprised mainly of a-pinene (63.64%), ß-pinene (15.00%), isocaryophyllene (7.62%), nerolidol (3.70%), 1-tridecanol (1.75%), limonene (1.52%), and sabinene (1.00%). The results provide scientific rationale for traditional use of raw products of these plants in controlling livestock ticks by the Bukusu community and lay down some groundwork for exploiting partially refined products such as essential oils of these plants in protecting cattle against infestations with R. appendiculatus.

U2 - 10.1155/2014/434506

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