Relations between students' perceived levels of self-regulation and their corresponding learning behavior and outcomes in a virtual experiment environment

Sjors Verstege, Héctor J. Pijeira-Díaz, Omid Noroozi, Harm Biemans, Julia Diederen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Virtual Experiment Environments (VEEs) have been shown as effective preparation steps for laboratory classes in natural science education. Given the self-directed nature of VEEs, students need adequate Self-Regulated
Learning (SRL) skills. This study explores the relation between students' perceived SRL level and their behavior and outcomes in a VEE in the field of enzymology. Ninety-seven higher education students were divided into
three groups of perceived SRL level (high, medium, and low). The VEE learning behavior (e.g., number of attempts and hints accessed) and VEE outcomes of these groups were compared while keeping prior knowledge as a covariate. While low self-regulated learners showed the least level of engagement with the VEE, high self-regulated learners showed the most optimum learning activity. Medium self-regulated learners engaged more in gaming the system behavior, and consequently learned the least. These results suggest that there is a nonlinear relationship between perceived SRL level and outcomes, since the intermediate level seems to be detrimental to learning, as explained through behavior. The intermediate level was characterized by an increase in agency, but
a lack of goal-directed and planning behavior. Implications for self-regulated learning theory and the design of VEEs in the best interest of students are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-334
Number of pages10
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume100
Early online date18 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

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