Relation between soil health, wave-like fluctuations in microbial populations, and soil-borne plant disease management

A.H.C. van Bruggen, A.M. Semenov, A.D. van Diepeningen, O.J. de Vos, W.J. Blok

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A healthy soil is often defined as a stable soil system with high levels of biological diversity and activity, internal nutrient cycling, and resilience to disturbance. This implies that microbial fluctuations after a disturbance would dampen more quickly in a healthy than in a chronically damaged and biologically impoverished soil. Soil could be disturbed by various processes, for example addition of a nutrient source, tillage, or drying-rewetting. As a result of any disturbance, the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria and of individual species start to oscillate, both in time and space. The oscillations appear as moving waves along the path of a moving nutrient source such as a root tip. The phase and period for different trophic groups and species of bacteria may be shifted indicating that succession occurs. DGGE, Biolog and FAME analysis of subsequent populations in oscillation have confirmed that there is a cyclic succession in microbial communities. Microbial diversity oscillates in opposite direction from oscillations in microbial populations. In a healthy soil, the amplitudes of these oscillations will be small, but the background levels of microbial diversity and activity are high, so that soil-borne diseases will face more competitors and antagonists. However, soil-borne pathogens and antagonists alike will fluctuate in time and space as a result of growing plant roots and other disturbances, and the periods and phases of the oscillations may vary. As a consequence, biological control by members of a single trophic group or species may never be complete, as pathogens will encounter varying populations of the biocontrol agent on the root surface. A mixture of different trophic groups may provide more complete biological control because peaks of different trophic groups occur at subsequent locations along a root. Alternatively, regular addition of soil organic matter may increase background levels of microbial activity, increase nutrient cycling, lower the concentrations of easily available nutrient sources, increase microbial diversity, and enhance natural disease suppression.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-122
JournalEuropean Journal of Plant Pathology
Volume115
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • combining biocontrol agents
  • organic farming systems
  • biological-control
  • bacterial-populations
  • damping-off
  • root-rot
  • species composition
  • conventional farms
  • mycorrhizal fungi
  • wheat roots

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