Regulation of photosynthesis and antioxidant metabolism in maize leaves at optimal and chilling temperatures : review

C.H. Foyer, H. VanAcker, L.D. Gomez, J. Harbinson

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126 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maize (Zea mays L.) is a chilling (below 15 °C) sensitive plant that shows little capacity to acclimate to low growth temperatures. Maize leaves are extremely sensitive to chilling injury, which usually results in premature leaf senescence. Leaves exposed to temperatures below 10 °C in the light show substantial inhibition of CO2 assimilation and down-regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. However, the intrinsic relationships between the quantum efficiencies of photosystems I and II are not modified by chilling. Moreover, the integral relationships between non-cyclic electron transport and CO2 fixation are similar in chilled and unchilled leaves. In this review we examine the roles and importance of photosynthetic regulation, carbon metabolism and antioxidant metabolism in determining the sensitivity of maize leaf photosynthesis to chilling. The distinct cellular localisation patterns of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) and dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1) can restrict the recycling of antioxidants associated with photosynthesis during chilling. Disruption of circadian regulation of metabolism and insufficient antioxidant defence are postulated to cause chilling sensitivity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)659-668
JournalPlant Physiology and Biochemistry
Volume40
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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Photosynthesis
glutathione dehydrogenase (ascorbate)
Zea mays
Antioxidants
photosynthesis
antioxidants
Temperature
metabolism
corn
Electron Transport
leaves
temperature
glutathione-disulfide reductase
electron transfer
Photosystem I Protein Complex
Photosystem II Protein Complex
Glutathione Reductase
Recycling
chilling injury
photosystem I

Cite this

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title = "Regulation of photosynthesis and antioxidant metabolism in maize leaves at optimal and chilling temperatures : review",
abstract = "Maize (Zea mays L.) is a chilling (below 15 °C) sensitive plant that shows little capacity to acclimate to low growth temperatures. Maize leaves are extremely sensitive to chilling injury, which usually results in premature leaf senescence. Leaves exposed to temperatures below 10 °C in the light show substantial inhibition of CO2 assimilation and down-regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. However, the intrinsic relationships between the quantum efficiencies of photosystems I and II are not modified by chilling. Moreover, the integral relationships between non-cyclic electron transport and CO2 fixation are similar in chilled and unchilled leaves. In this review we examine the roles and importance of photosynthetic regulation, carbon metabolism and antioxidant metabolism in determining the sensitivity of maize leaf photosynthesis to chilling. The distinct cellular localisation patterns of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) and dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1) can restrict the recycling of antioxidants associated with photosynthesis during chilling. Disruption of circadian regulation of metabolism and insufficient antioxidant defence are postulated to cause chilling sensitivity.",
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Regulation of photosynthesis and antioxidant metabolism in maize leaves at optimal and chilling temperatures : review. / Foyer, C.H.; VanAcker, H.; Gomez, L.D.; Harbinson, J.

In: Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Vol. 40, 2002, p. 659-668.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Regulation of photosynthesis and antioxidant metabolism in maize leaves at optimal and chilling temperatures : review

AU - Foyer, C.H.

AU - VanAcker, H.

AU - Gomez, L.D.

AU - Harbinson, J.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

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AB - Maize (Zea mays L.) is a chilling (below 15 °C) sensitive plant that shows little capacity to acclimate to low growth temperatures. Maize leaves are extremely sensitive to chilling injury, which usually results in premature leaf senescence. Leaves exposed to temperatures below 10 °C in the light show substantial inhibition of CO2 assimilation and down-regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. However, the intrinsic relationships between the quantum efficiencies of photosystems I and II are not modified by chilling. Moreover, the integral relationships between non-cyclic electron transport and CO2 fixation are similar in chilled and unchilled leaves. In this review we examine the roles and importance of photosynthetic regulation, carbon metabolism and antioxidant metabolism in determining the sensitivity of maize leaf photosynthesis to chilling. The distinct cellular localisation patterns of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) and dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1) can restrict the recycling of antioxidants associated with photosynthesis during chilling. Disruption of circadian regulation of metabolism and insufficient antioxidant defence are postulated to cause chilling sensitivity.

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JO - Plant Physiology and Biochemistry

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SN - 0981-9428

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