Regulation of growth and nutrient uptake under different transpiration regimes

F.M. del Amor, L.F.M. Marcelis

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademicpeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    To determine the extent to which air humidity affects the regulation of nutrient demand, an experiment with tomato plants was carried out under fully controlled climate conditions. Treatments consisted of three levels of relative air humidity (RH): 50%, 70% (control) and 95%, corresponding to 1.32, 0.79 and 0.13 kPa vapour pressure deficit (VPD), respectively. High humidity reduced the total plant dry matter, leaf dry weight, and total leaf area but no effect was found in leaf dry matter percentage. High humidity also increased the dry matter partitioning into the stems but reduced the dry matter partitioning into the leaves. Relative growth rate (RGR) was reduced by both high and low air humidity compared with the control with the stronger effect at 95%RH. Net assimilation rate (NAR) was more reduced than leaf area ratio (LAR) at low humidity, but at high humidity both parameters were affected to a similar extent. Water use efficiency (WUE) increased from 3.4 mgDM/ml H2O at 70%RH to 7.4 mgDM/ml H2O at 95%RH. The concentrations of N, K and Mg were not affected by humidity but concentrations of P, Ca and S in the plant were reduced at high humidity.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationInternational Symposium on Soilless Culture and Hydroponics
    EditorsM. Urrestarazu Gavilan
    Place of PublicationLeuven
    PublisherISHS
    Pages523-528
    Volume697
    ISBN (Print)9789066051973
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005
    EventInternational Symposium on Soilless Culture and Hydroponics -
    Duration: 31 Dec 2005 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceInternational Symposium on Soilless Culture and Hydroponics
    Period31/12/05 → …

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Regulation of growth and nutrient uptake under different transpiration regimes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this