Reducing the Incidence of Acute Pesticide Poisoning by Educating Farmers on Integrated Pest Management in South India

F. Mancini, J.L.S. Jiggins, M. O'Malley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sixty-five farmers reported on pesticide use and the signs and symptoms of acute pesticide poisoning when using two different plant protection strategies: in 2003 using chemical controls and in 2004 using an approach to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) based on an ecological analysis of the field conditions. Exposure to organophosphates was confirmed as a serious risk factor for occupational poisoning. The adoption of IPM reduced the use of pesticides and halved the incidence of acute pesticide poisoning. Overall, the pesticide use spectrum shifted towards lower WHO Hazard Classes. A reduction of adverse health effects was attained through a reduction in exposure to toxic pesticides and behavioural changes. Given that other strategies to reduce the rate of acute poisoning have proven ineffective, interventions aiming to minimize pesticide poisoning in India and in other developing countries with similar rural conditions should focus on restricting the use of highly toxic compounds and educating farmers on IPM.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-151
JournalInternational Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • developing-countries
  • developing-world
  • health
  • exposure
  • acetylcholinesterase
  • prevention
  • nicaragua
  • children
  • risk

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