Reconstructing Early Pleistocene (1.3 Ma) terrestrial environmental change in western Anatolia: Did it drive fluvial terrace formation?

A. Veldkamp, I. Candy, A.G. Jongmans, D. Maddy, T. Demir, J.M. Schoorl, D. Schreve, C. Stemerdink, T. van der Schriek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

A terrestrial environmental reconstruction of an Early Pleistocene landscape from western Anatolia is presented. The basis of this reconstruction is a sedimentary stack comprising fluvial and colluvial slope deposits. Contained within this stack is a sequence comprising two massive laminar calcretes alternating with three reddish palaeosols. This evolutionary sequence is situated on top of a fluvial terrace staircase capped by a 1.3 Ma (40Ar/39Ar plateau age) lava flow. The micro-morphological properties of the observed calcretes and reddish palaeosols combined with the stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the carbonates suggest the alternation of three stable relatively warm–humid (vegetation rich) and two stable relatively arid–cool (bare surface) cycles. In addition, there is also ample evidence for landscape instability in between these phases causing local soil truncation and slope instability in an open grassland–shrub environment. These landscape instability phases match well with known fluvial incisional phases of the Gediz during this period. This suggests that climate-forced landscape environmental dynamics were of sufficient magnitude to drive fluvial terrace formation of the Early Pleistocene Gediz.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-104
JournalPalaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology
Volume417
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

terraces
terrace
environmental change
Pleistocene
paleosol
lava
lava flow
carbonates
plateaus
isotopic composition
plateau
climate
oxygen
carbonate
vegetation
carbon
soil
stack

Keywords

  • paleoenvironmental significance
  • volcanic disruption
  • gediz river
  • turkey
  • climate
  • paleosols
  • genesis
  • record
  • variability
  • carbonates

Cite this

Veldkamp, A. ; Candy, I. ; Jongmans, A.G. ; Maddy, D. ; Demir, T. ; Schoorl, J.M. ; Schreve, D. ; Stemerdink, C. ; van der Schriek, T. / Reconstructing Early Pleistocene (1.3 Ma) terrestrial environmental change in western Anatolia: Did it drive fluvial terrace formation?. In: Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology. 2015 ; Vol. 417. pp. 91-104.
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title = "Reconstructing Early Pleistocene (1.3 Ma) terrestrial environmental change in western Anatolia: Did it drive fluvial terrace formation?",
abstract = "A terrestrial environmental reconstruction of an Early Pleistocene landscape from western Anatolia is presented. The basis of this reconstruction is a sedimentary stack comprising fluvial and colluvial slope deposits. Contained within this stack is a sequence comprising two massive laminar calcretes alternating with three reddish palaeosols. This evolutionary sequence is situated on top of a fluvial terrace staircase capped by a 1.3 Ma (40Ar/39Ar plateau age) lava flow. The micro-morphological properties of the observed calcretes and reddish palaeosols combined with the stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the carbonates suggest the alternation of three stable relatively warm–humid (vegetation rich) and two stable relatively arid–cool (bare surface) cycles. In addition, there is also ample evidence for landscape instability in between these phases causing local soil truncation and slope instability in an open grassland–shrub environment. These landscape instability phases match well with known fluvial incisional phases of the Gediz during this period. This suggests that climate-forced landscape environmental dynamics were of sufficient magnitude to drive fluvial terrace formation of the Early Pleistocene Gediz.",
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Reconstructing Early Pleistocene (1.3 Ma) terrestrial environmental change in western Anatolia: Did it drive fluvial terrace formation? / Veldkamp, A.; Candy, I.; Jongmans, A.G.; Maddy, D.; Demir, T.; Schoorl, J.M.; Schreve, D.; Stemerdink, C.; van der Schriek, T.

In: Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology, Vol. 417, 2015, p. 91-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reconstructing Early Pleistocene (1.3 Ma) terrestrial environmental change in western Anatolia: Did it drive fluvial terrace formation?

AU - Veldkamp, A.

AU - Candy, I.

AU - Jongmans, A.G.

AU - Maddy, D.

AU - Demir, T.

AU - Schoorl, J.M.

AU - Schreve, D.

AU - Stemerdink, C.

AU - van der Schriek, T.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - A terrestrial environmental reconstruction of an Early Pleistocene landscape from western Anatolia is presented. The basis of this reconstruction is a sedimentary stack comprising fluvial and colluvial slope deposits. Contained within this stack is a sequence comprising two massive laminar calcretes alternating with three reddish palaeosols. This evolutionary sequence is situated on top of a fluvial terrace staircase capped by a 1.3 Ma (40Ar/39Ar plateau age) lava flow. The micro-morphological properties of the observed calcretes and reddish palaeosols combined with the stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the carbonates suggest the alternation of three stable relatively warm–humid (vegetation rich) and two stable relatively arid–cool (bare surface) cycles. In addition, there is also ample evidence for landscape instability in between these phases causing local soil truncation and slope instability in an open grassland–shrub environment. These landscape instability phases match well with known fluvial incisional phases of the Gediz during this period. This suggests that climate-forced landscape environmental dynamics were of sufficient magnitude to drive fluvial terrace formation of the Early Pleistocene Gediz.

AB - A terrestrial environmental reconstruction of an Early Pleistocene landscape from western Anatolia is presented. The basis of this reconstruction is a sedimentary stack comprising fluvial and colluvial slope deposits. Contained within this stack is a sequence comprising two massive laminar calcretes alternating with three reddish palaeosols. This evolutionary sequence is situated on top of a fluvial terrace staircase capped by a 1.3 Ma (40Ar/39Ar plateau age) lava flow. The micro-morphological properties of the observed calcretes and reddish palaeosols combined with the stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the carbonates suggest the alternation of three stable relatively warm–humid (vegetation rich) and two stable relatively arid–cool (bare surface) cycles. In addition, there is also ample evidence for landscape instability in between these phases causing local soil truncation and slope instability in an open grassland–shrub environment. These landscape instability phases match well with known fluvial incisional phases of the Gediz during this period. This suggests that climate-forced landscape environmental dynamics were of sufficient magnitude to drive fluvial terrace formation of the Early Pleistocene Gediz.

KW - paleoenvironmental significance

KW - volcanic disruption

KW - gediz river

KW - turkey

KW - climate

KW - paleosols

KW - genesis

KW - record

KW - variability

KW - carbonates

U2 - 10.1016/j.palaeo.2014.10.022

DO - 10.1016/j.palaeo.2014.10.022

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VL - 417

SP - 91

EP - 104

JO - Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology

JF - Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology

SN - 0031-0182

ER -