Reassembling nature and culture: Resourceful farming in Araponga, Brazil

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article highlights the emergence of a regenerative, agroecological mode of agriculture following the ongoing process of experimentation and learning by a settlement of landless people and farm workers. It examines how they engaged anew with ‘nature’ and generated resourceful farming practices as a result of a threefold process of cultural re-appreciation, a re-grounding in local natural resources and a political-economic re-positioning towards prevailing regimes in policies, markets and technologies. We argue that the construction of resourceful farming culminates around: finding and forging productive alignments with non-human nature such as weeds, trees and mychorrizal fungi, viewing the contribution of non-human nature not only in terms of their value as a commodity, but as adding value in many different ways and building a socio-material resource base and an institutional setting that allows farmers to farm more autonomously.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-322
JournalJournal of Rural Studies
Volume61
Early online date16 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

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agricultural worker
commodity
positioning
weed
natural resource
Brazil
learning
fungus
farm
agriculture
market
resource
economics
farm worker
Values
natural resources
farmer
regime
resources
alignment

Cite this

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title = "Reassembling nature and culture: Resourceful farming in Araponga, Brazil",
abstract = "This article highlights the emergence of a regenerative, agroecological mode of agriculture following the ongoing process of experimentation and learning by a settlement of landless people and farm workers. It examines how they engaged anew with ‘nature’ and generated resourceful farming practices as a result of a threefold process of cultural re-appreciation, a re-grounding in local natural resources and a political-economic re-positioning towards prevailing regimes in policies, markets and technologies. We argue that the construction of resourceful farming culminates around: finding and forging productive alignments with non-human nature such as weeds, trees and mychorrizal fungi, viewing the contribution of non-human nature not only in terms of their value as a commodity, but as adding value in many different ways and building a socio-material resource base and an institutional setting that allows farmers to farm more autonomously.",
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Reassembling nature and culture: Resourceful farming in Araponga, Brazil. / van den Berg, Leonardo; Roep, Dirk; Hebinck, Paul; Teixeira, Heitor Mancini.

In: Journal of Rural Studies, Vol. 61, 07.2018, p. 314-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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