Reanalyzing the Palaeoptera problem – The origin of insect flight remains obscure

Sabrina Simon*, Alexander Blanke, Karen Meusemann

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The phylogenetic relationships of the winged insect lineages – mayflies (Ephemeroptera), damselflies and dragonflies (Odonata), and all other winged insects (Neoptera) – are still controversial with three hypotheses supported by different datasets: Palaeoptera, Metapterygota and Chiastomyaria. Here, we reanalyze available phylogenomic data with a focus on detecting confounding and alternative signal. In this context, we provide a framework to quantitatively evaluate and assess incongruent molecular phylogenetic signal inherent in phylogenomic datasets. Despite overall support for the Palaeoptera hypothesis, we also found considerable signal for Chiastomyaria, which is not easily detectable by standardized tree inference approaches. Analyses of the accumulation of signal across gene partitions showed that signal accumulates gradually. However, even in case signal only slightly supported one over the other hypothesis, topologies inferred from large datasets switch from statistically strongly supported Palaeoptera to strongly supported Chiastomyaria. From a morphological point of view, Palaeoptera currently appears to be the best-supported hypothesis; however, recent analyses were restricted to head characters. Phylogenetic approaches covering all organ systems including analyses of potential functional or developmental convergence are still pending so that the Palaeoptera problem has to be considered an open question in insect systematics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-338
JournalArthropod Structure and Development
Volume47
Issue number4
Early online date30 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

Keywords

  • Chiastomyaria
  • Homologization
  • Metapterygota
  • Palaeoptera
  • Phylogenomics
  • Transcriptomics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reanalyzing the Palaeoptera problem – The origin of insect flight remains obscure'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this