Rapid mosaic brain evolution under artificial selection for relative telencephalon size in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

Stephanie Fong*, Björn Rogell, Mirjam Amcoff, Alexander Kotrschal, Wouter van der Bijl, Séverine D. Buechel, Niclas Kolm*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mosaic brain evolution hypothesis, stating that brain regions can evolve relatively independently during cognitive evolution, is an important idea to understand how brains evolve with potential implications even for human brain evolution. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence for this hypothesis through an artificial selection experiment in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). After four generations of selection on relative telencephalon volume (relative to brain size), we found substantial changes in telencephalon size but no changes in other regions. Further comparisons revealed that up-selected lines had larger telencephalon, while down-selected lines had smaller telencephalon than wild Trinidadian populations. Our results support that independent evolutionary changes in specific brain regions through mosaic brain evolution can be important facilitators of cognitive evolution.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbereabj4314
JournalScience Advances
Volume7
Issue number46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Rapid mosaic brain evolution under artificial selection for relative telencephalon size in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this