Randomized Controlled Trial of Exercise and Nutrition Supplementation on Physical and Cognitive Function in Older Chinese Adults Aged 50 Years and Older

Jean Woo*, Ruth Chan, Sherlin Ong, Marjolijn Bragt, Rolf Bos, Panam Parikh, Lisette C.P.G.M. de Groot

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess whether a 24-week multidomain lifestyle intervention including a nutritional milk supplement and an exercise program had any effect on physical and cognitive function, self-rated health, and health-related quality of life in older Chinese adults. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting and participants: Community-living people aged 50 years and older. Methods: 180 participants (mean age 61 ± 6 years) were randomized to 24 weeks of exercise plus nutrition supplementation or no intervention. The primary outcome was gait speed, with additional physical and cognitive function measures, self-rated health, and health-related quality of life as secondary outcomes. Information collected also included dietary intake by 3-day dietary records, and blood sampling for renal function, glycated hemoglobin, serum vitamin B12, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and biochemical indices of bone turnover. Results: There was no significant group difference in the change of gait speed, muscle strength, muscle power, cardiovascular fitness, or cognitive function over time, either by intention-to-treat or per-protocol analysis. A significant time × group effect (P = .039) on self-rated health was detected, but there was no significant time or time × group difference in the change of physical and mental health-related quality of life measures over time. In addition, moderate physical activity level was greatly increased from baseline to 24 weeks in the intervention group compared with the control group. Conclusions and implications: A 24-week exercise and nutrition supplementation program among community-living people in late midlife to early old age improved self-rated health and the overall level of physical activity, without objective improvements in physical and cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)395-403
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume21
Issue number3
Early online date23 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2020

Keywords

  • cognitive function
  • Exercise
  • nutrition
  • older adults
  • physical performance
  • self-rated health

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