Quantitative Assessment Of The Health Risk For Livestock When Animal Viruses Are Applied in Human Oncolytic Therapy: A Case Study for Seneca Valley Virus

Jack Schijven*, Sabrina Brizee, Peter Teunis, C.J. de Vos-de Jong, P.L. Eble, Saskia Rutjes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Some viruses cause tumor regression and can be used to treat cancer patients; these viruses are called oncolytic viruses. To assess whether oncolytic viruses from animal origin excreted by patients pose a health risk for livestock, a quantitative risk assessment (QRA) was performed to estimate the risk for the Dutch pig industry after environmental release of Seneca Valley virus (SVV). The QRA assumed SVV excretion in stool by one cancer patient on Day 1 in the Netherlands, discharge of SVV with treated wastewater into the river Meuse, downstream intake of river water for drinking water production, and consumption of this drinking water by pigs. Dose–response curves for SVV infection and clinical disease in pigs were constructed from experimental data. In the worst scenario (four log10 virus reduction by drinking water treatment and a farm with 10,000 pigs), the infection risk is less than 1% with 95% certainty. The risk of clinical disease is almost seven orders of magnitude lower. Risks may increase proportionally with the numbers of treated patients and days of virus excretion. These data indicate that application of wild‐type oncolytic animal viruses may infect susceptible livestock. A QRA regarding the use of oncolytic animal virus is, therefore, highly recommended. For this, data on excretion by patients, and dose–response parameters for infection and clinical disease in livestock, should be studied.
Original languageEnglish
Article number13227
Pages (from-to)982-991
JournalRisk Analysis
Volume39
Issue number5
Early online date5 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

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Health risks
Livestock
Viruses
Farms
Animals
Oncolytic Viruses
Health
Swine
Drinking Water
Therapeutics
Rivers
Potable water
Risk assessment
Drinking
Oncogenic Viruses
Water Purification
Virus Diseases
Waste Water
Infection
Netherlands

Cite this

Schijven, Jack ; Brizee, Sabrina ; Teunis, Peter ; de Vos-de Jong, C.J. ; Eble, P.L. ; Rutjes, Saskia. / Quantitative Assessment Of The Health Risk For Livestock When Animal Viruses Are Applied in Human Oncolytic Therapy: A Case Study for Seneca Valley Virus. In: Risk Analysis. 2019 ; Vol. 39, No. 5. pp. 982-991.
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Quantitative Assessment Of The Health Risk For Livestock When Animal Viruses Are Applied in Human Oncolytic Therapy: A Case Study for Seneca Valley Virus. / Schijven, Jack; Brizee, Sabrina; Teunis, Peter; de Vos-de Jong, C.J.; Eble, P.L.; Rutjes, Saskia.

In: Risk Analysis, Vol. 39, No. 5, 13227, 05.2019, p. 982-991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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