Public-private partnerships in China's urban water sector

L. Zhong, A.P.J. Mol, T. Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the past decades, the traditional state monopoly in urban water management has been debated heavily, resulting in different forms and degrees of private sector involvement across the globe. Since the 1990s, China has also started experiments with new modes of urban water service management and governance in which the private sector is involved. It is premature to conclude whether the various forms of private sector involvement will successfully overcome the major problems (capital shortage, inefficient operation, and service quality) in China¿s water sector. But at the same time, private sector involvement in water provisioning and waste water treatments seems to have become mainstream in transitional China.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-877
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

public-private partnership
private sector
Water
Water management
Water treatment
monopoly
Wastewater
water management
water
urban water
Experiments
experiment

Keywords

  • participation
  • efficiency

Cite this

Zhong, L. ; Mol, A.P.J. ; Fu, T. / Public-private partnerships in China's urban water sector. In: Environmental Management. 2008 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 863-877.
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Public-private partnerships in China's urban water sector. / Zhong, L.; Mol, A.P.J.; Fu, T.

In: Environmental Management, Vol. 41, No. 6, 2008, p. 863-877.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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