Protein intake and lean body mass preservation during energy intake restriction in overweight older adults

E.M.P. Backx, Michael Tieland, K.J. Borgonjen-van den Berg, P.R. Claessen, L.J.C. van Loon, C.P.G.M. de Groot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Dietary-induced weight loss is generally accompanied by a decline in skeletal muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass leads to a decline in muscle strength and impairs physical performance. A high dietary protein intake has been suggested to allow muscle mass preservation during energy intake restriction. Objective: To investigate the impact of increasing dietary protein intake on lean body mass, strength and physical performance during 12 weeks of energy intake restriction in overweight older adults. Design: Sixty-one overweight and obese men and women (63±5 years) were randomly assigned to either a high protein diet (HP; 1.7¿g¿kg-1 per day; n=31) or normal protein diet (NP; 0.9¿g¿kg-1 per day; n=30) during a 12-week 25% energy intake restriction. During this controlled dietary intervention, 90% of the diet was provided by the university. At baseline and after the intervention, body weight, lean body mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), leg strength (1-repetition maximum), physical performance (Short Physical Performance Battery, 400¿m) and habitual physical activity (actigraph) were assessed. Results: Body weight declined in both groups with no differences between the HP and NP groups (-8.9±2.9 versus -9.1±3.4¿kg, respectively; P=0.584). Lean body mass declined by 1.8±2.2 and 2.1±1.4¿kg, respectively, with no significant differences between groups (P=0.213). Leg strength had decreased during the intervention by 8.8±14.0 and 8.9±12.8¿kg, with no differences between groups (P=0.689). Physical performance as measured by 400¿m walking speed improved in both groups, with no differences between groups (P=0.219). Conclusions: Increasing protein intake above habitual intake levels (0.9¿g¿kg-1 per day) does not preserve lean body mass, strength or physical performance during prolonged energy intake restriction in overweight older adults.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-304
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Energy Intake
Dietary Proteins
Diet
Leg
Proteins
Body Weight
Muscles
Photon Absorptiometry
Muscle Strength
Weight Loss
Skeletal Muscle
Exercise

Cite this

@article{ea986672b50448f38ea4934f06fe6d39,
title = "Protein intake and lean body mass preservation during energy intake restriction in overweight older adults",
abstract = "Background: Dietary-induced weight loss is generally accompanied by a decline in skeletal muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass leads to a decline in muscle strength and impairs physical performance. A high dietary protein intake has been suggested to allow muscle mass preservation during energy intake restriction. Objective: To investigate the impact of increasing dietary protein intake on lean body mass, strength and physical performance during 12 weeks of energy intake restriction in overweight older adults. Design: Sixty-one overweight and obese men and women (63±5 years) were randomly assigned to either a high protein diet (HP; 1.7¿g¿kg-1 per day; n=31) or normal protein diet (NP; 0.9¿g¿kg-1 per day; n=30) during a 12-week 25{\%} energy intake restriction. During this controlled dietary intervention, 90{\%} of the diet was provided by the university. At baseline and after the intervention, body weight, lean body mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), leg strength (1-repetition maximum), physical performance (Short Physical Performance Battery, 400¿m) and habitual physical activity (actigraph) were assessed. Results: Body weight declined in both groups with no differences between the HP and NP groups (-8.9±2.9 versus -9.1±3.4¿kg, respectively; P=0.584). Lean body mass declined by 1.8±2.2 and 2.1±1.4¿kg, respectively, with no significant differences between groups (P=0.213). Leg strength had decreased during the intervention by 8.8±14.0 and 8.9±12.8¿kg, with no differences between groups (P=0.689). Physical performance as measured by 400¿m walking speed improved in both groups, with no differences between groups (P=0.219). Conclusions: Increasing protein intake above habitual intake levels (0.9¿g¿kg-1 per day) does not preserve lean body mass, strength or physical performance during prolonged energy intake restriction in overweight older adults.",
author = "E.M.P. Backx and Michael Tieland and {Borgonjen-van den Berg}, K.J. and P.R. Claessen and {van Loon}, L.J.C. and {de Groot}, C.P.G.M.",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1038/ijo.2015.182",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "299--304",
journal = "International Journal of Obesity",
issn = "0307-0565",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

Protein intake and lean body mass preservation during energy intake restriction in overweight older adults. / Backx, E.M.P.; Tieland, Michael; Borgonjen-van den Berg, K.J.; Claessen, P.R.; van Loon, L.J.C.; de Groot, C.P.G.M.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 40, No. 2, 2016, p. 299-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Protein intake and lean body mass preservation during energy intake restriction in overweight older adults

AU - Backx, E.M.P.

AU - Tieland, Michael

AU - Borgonjen-van den Berg, K.J.

AU - Claessen, P.R.

AU - van Loon, L.J.C.

AU - de Groot, C.P.G.M.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Dietary-induced weight loss is generally accompanied by a decline in skeletal muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass leads to a decline in muscle strength and impairs physical performance. A high dietary protein intake has been suggested to allow muscle mass preservation during energy intake restriction. Objective: To investigate the impact of increasing dietary protein intake on lean body mass, strength and physical performance during 12 weeks of energy intake restriction in overweight older adults. Design: Sixty-one overweight and obese men and women (63±5 years) were randomly assigned to either a high protein diet (HP; 1.7¿g¿kg-1 per day; n=31) or normal protein diet (NP; 0.9¿g¿kg-1 per day; n=30) during a 12-week 25% energy intake restriction. During this controlled dietary intervention, 90% of the diet was provided by the university. At baseline and after the intervention, body weight, lean body mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), leg strength (1-repetition maximum), physical performance (Short Physical Performance Battery, 400¿m) and habitual physical activity (actigraph) were assessed. Results: Body weight declined in both groups with no differences between the HP and NP groups (-8.9±2.9 versus -9.1±3.4¿kg, respectively; P=0.584). Lean body mass declined by 1.8±2.2 and 2.1±1.4¿kg, respectively, with no significant differences between groups (P=0.213). Leg strength had decreased during the intervention by 8.8±14.0 and 8.9±12.8¿kg, with no differences between groups (P=0.689). Physical performance as measured by 400¿m walking speed improved in both groups, with no differences between groups (P=0.219). Conclusions: Increasing protein intake above habitual intake levels (0.9¿g¿kg-1 per day) does not preserve lean body mass, strength or physical performance during prolonged energy intake restriction in overweight older adults.

AB - Background: Dietary-induced weight loss is generally accompanied by a decline in skeletal muscle mass. The loss of muscle mass leads to a decline in muscle strength and impairs physical performance. A high dietary protein intake has been suggested to allow muscle mass preservation during energy intake restriction. Objective: To investigate the impact of increasing dietary protein intake on lean body mass, strength and physical performance during 12 weeks of energy intake restriction in overweight older adults. Design: Sixty-one overweight and obese men and women (63±5 years) were randomly assigned to either a high protein diet (HP; 1.7¿g¿kg-1 per day; n=31) or normal protein diet (NP; 0.9¿g¿kg-1 per day; n=30) during a 12-week 25% energy intake restriction. During this controlled dietary intervention, 90% of the diet was provided by the university. At baseline and after the intervention, body weight, lean body mass (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), leg strength (1-repetition maximum), physical performance (Short Physical Performance Battery, 400¿m) and habitual physical activity (actigraph) were assessed. Results: Body weight declined in both groups with no differences between the HP and NP groups (-8.9±2.9 versus -9.1±3.4¿kg, respectively; P=0.584). Lean body mass declined by 1.8±2.2 and 2.1±1.4¿kg, respectively, with no significant differences between groups (P=0.213). Leg strength had decreased during the intervention by 8.8±14.0 and 8.9±12.8¿kg, with no differences between groups (P=0.689). Physical performance as measured by 400¿m walking speed improved in both groups, with no differences between groups (P=0.219). Conclusions: Increasing protein intake above habitual intake levels (0.9¿g¿kg-1 per day) does not preserve lean body mass, strength or physical performance during prolonged energy intake restriction in overweight older adults.

U2 - 10.1038/ijo.2015.182

DO - 10.1038/ijo.2015.182

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 299

EP - 304

JO - International Journal of Obesity

JF - International Journal of Obesity

SN - 0307-0565

IS - 2

ER -