Proceedings of the Frontis Workshop on Chemical Ecology: from Gene to Ecosystem Wageningen, The Netherlands 19-23 March 2005

M. Dicke (Editor), W. Takken (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportBook editingAcademic

Abstract

Chemical ecology is the ecology of body odour. Every organism uses chemical information in intra- and interspecific interactions. Animals emit chemicals to attract a mate or to prevent a competitor from mating with the partner they just mated with. Plants emit chemicals to recruit other organisms to take care of their sex life or to attract bodyguards to defend them against their enemies. Chemical cues mediate a whole gamut of interactions in plant and animal communities. Chemical cues are used to communicate, but can also be exploited in espionage or eavesdropping. To understand the ecology of chemical signalling in communities one needs to carry out manipulative experiments. Such experiments have been done throughout the last century. However, in recent years the degree of precision with which such experiments can be done has grown tremendously as a result of rapidly increasing knowledge at the molecular-genetic level. This opens exciting new avenues to chemical ecologists. The connection of molecular genetics to community ecology and ecosystem ecology provides novel tools to take up old questions that were often hard to answer
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationDordrecht
PublisherSpringer
Number of pages189
ISBN (Print)9781402047831
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Publication series

NameWageningen UR Frontis Series
PublisherSpringer
No.16
ISSN (Print)1573-4544

Keywords

  • chemical ecology
  • ecology
  • ecosystems
  • populations
  • genes
  • species
  • community ecology
  • plants
  • insects
  • insect pests
  • animals
  • interactions
  • communication
  • defence mechanisms
  • insect plant relations

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  • Projects

    Malaria control by means of an entomopathogenic fungus.

    Takken, W.

    1/01/041/06/09

    Project: PostDoc

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