Prevalence of leptospira infection in rodents from Bangladesh

Inge M. Krijger*, Ahmed A.A. Ahmed, Marga G.A. Goris, Peter W.G. Groot Koerkamp, Bastiaan G. Meerburg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Worldwide, Leptospira infection poses an increasing public health problem. In 2008, leptospirosis was recognised as a re-emerging zoonosis of global importance with South-East Asia being one of the most significant centres of the disease. Rodents are thought to be the most important host for a variety of Leptospira serovars. Because Bangladesh offers a suitable humid climate for the survival of these pathogenic bacteria, the presence of rodents could be a serious risk for human infection, especially in peri-urban areas or locations where food is stored. In order to gain more understanding of the multi-host epidemiology, a prevalence study was conducted in Comilla, Bangladesh to determine the presence of pathogenic Leptospira species in rodents. Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) and sequencing showed that 13.1% (61/465) of the trapped rodents were infected with pathogenic Leptospira. Sequencing of the qPCR products identified the presence of three species: Leptospira interrogans, Leptospira borgpetersenii, and Leptospira kirschneri. Rodents of the genus, Bandicota, were significantly more likely to be positive than those of the genus, Rattus and Mus. Our results confirm the importance of rodents as hosts of pathogenic Leptospira and indicate that human exposure to pathogenic Leptospira may be considerable, also in places where food (rice) is stored for longer times. This study emphasizes the need to improve rodent management at such locations and to further quantify the public health impacts of this neglected emerging zoonosis in Bangladesh.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2113
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Leptospira
Bangladesh
Rodentia
Infection
Zoonoses
Public Health
Leptospira interrogans
Murinae
Food
Leptospirosis
Far East
Climate
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Bacteria
Survival

Keywords

  • Food safety
  • Leptospirosis
  • Reservoir
  • Rodents
  • Zoonosis

Cite this

@article{91429fd657634ecb87133d6f2f85d02b,
title = "Prevalence of leptospira infection in rodents from Bangladesh",
abstract = "Worldwide, Leptospira infection poses an increasing public health problem. In 2008, leptospirosis was recognised as a re-emerging zoonosis of global importance with South-East Asia being one of the most significant centres of the disease. Rodents are thought to be the most important host for a variety of Leptospira serovars. Because Bangladesh offers a suitable humid climate for the survival of these pathogenic bacteria, the presence of rodents could be a serious risk for human infection, especially in peri-urban areas or locations where food is stored. In order to gain more understanding of the multi-host epidemiology, a prevalence study was conducted in Comilla, Bangladesh to determine the presence of pathogenic Leptospira species in rodents. Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) and sequencing showed that 13.1{\%} (61/465) of the trapped rodents were infected with pathogenic Leptospira. Sequencing of the qPCR products identified the presence of three species: Leptospira interrogans, Leptospira borgpetersenii, and Leptospira kirschneri. Rodents of the genus, Bandicota, were significantly more likely to be positive than those of the genus, Rattus and Mus. Our results confirm the importance of rodents as hosts of pathogenic Leptospira and indicate that human exposure to pathogenic Leptospira may be considerable, also in places where food (rice) is stored for longer times. This study emphasizes the need to improve rodent management at such locations and to further quantify the public health impacts of this neglected emerging zoonosis in Bangladesh.",
keywords = "Food safety, Leptospirosis, Reservoir, Rodents, Zoonosis",
author = "Krijger, {Inge M.} and Ahmed, {Ahmed A.A.} and Goris, {Marga G.A.} and {Groot Koerkamp}, {Peter W.G.} and Meerburg, {Bastiaan G.}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "14",
doi = "10.3390/ijerph16122113",
language = "English",
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journal = "International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health",
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Prevalence of leptospira infection in rodents from Bangladesh. / Krijger, Inge M.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.A.; Goris, Marga G.A.; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W.G.; Meerburg, Bastiaan G.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 16, No. 12, 2113, 14.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of leptospira infection in rodents from Bangladesh

AU - Krijger, Inge M.

AU - Ahmed, Ahmed A.A.

AU - Goris, Marga G.A.

AU - Groot Koerkamp, Peter W.G.

AU - Meerburg, Bastiaan G.

PY - 2019/6/14

Y1 - 2019/6/14

N2 - Worldwide, Leptospira infection poses an increasing public health problem. In 2008, leptospirosis was recognised as a re-emerging zoonosis of global importance with South-East Asia being one of the most significant centres of the disease. Rodents are thought to be the most important host for a variety of Leptospira serovars. Because Bangladesh offers a suitable humid climate for the survival of these pathogenic bacteria, the presence of rodents could be a serious risk for human infection, especially in peri-urban areas or locations where food is stored. In order to gain more understanding of the multi-host epidemiology, a prevalence study was conducted in Comilla, Bangladesh to determine the presence of pathogenic Leptospira species in rodents. Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) and sequencing showed that 13.1% (61/465) of the trapped rodents were infected with pathogenic Leptospira. Sequencing of the qPCR products identified the presence of three species: Leptospira interrogans, Leptospira borgpetersenii, and Leptospira kirschneri. Rodents of the genus, Bandicota, were significantly more likely to be positive than those of the genus, Rattus and Mus. Our results confirm the importance of rodents as hosts of pathogenic Leptospira and indicate that human exposure to pathogenic Leptospira may be considerable, also in places where food (rice) is stored for longer times. This study emphasizes the need to improve rodent management at such locations and to further quantify the public health impacts of this neglected emerging zoonosis in Bangladesh.

AB - Worldwide, Leptospira infection poses an increasing public health problem. In 2008, leptospirosis was recognised as a re-emerging zoonosis of global importance with South-East Asia being one of the most significant centres of the disease. Rodents are thought to be the most important host for a variety of Leptospira serovars. Because Bangladesh offers a suitable humid climate for the survival of these pathogenic bacteria, the presence of rodents could be a serious risk for human infection, especially in peri-urban areas or locations where food is stored. In order to gain more understanding of the multi-host epidemiology, a prevalence study was conducted in Comilla, Bangladesh to determine the presence of pathogenic Leptospira species in rodents. Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) and sequencing showed that 13.1% (61/465) of the trapped rodents were infected with pathogenic Leptospira. Sequencing of the qPCR products identified the presence of three species: Leptospira interrogans, Leptospira borgpetersenii, and Leptospira kirschneri. Rodents of the genus, Bandicota, were significantly more likely to be positive than those of the genus, Rattus and Mus. Our results confirm the importance of rodents as hosts of pathogenic Leptospira and indicate that human exposure to pathogenic Leptospira may be considerable, also in places where food (rice) is stored for longer times. This study emphasizes the need to improve rodent management at such locations and to further quantify the public health impacts of this neglected emerging zoonosis in Bangladesh.

KW - Food safety

KW - Leptospirosis

KW - Reservoir

KW - Rodents

KW - Zoonosis

U2 - 10.3390/ijerph16122113

DO - 10.3390/ijerph16122113

M3 - Article

VL - 16

JO - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

SN - 1660-4601

IS - 12

M1 - 2113

ER -