Potential human health effects following exposure to nano- and microplastics, lessons learned from nanomaterials

Hugo Brouwer, Femke L.N. van Oijen, Hans Bouwmeester

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A substantial part of the plastic produced worldwide ends up in the environment and degrades into nano- and microplastics. The particles are ubiquitously present in the air and enter the food production chain as contaminants. Ingestion of nano- and microplastics present in food and drinking water, or those present in swallowed lung mucus that contain trapped particles, represent the main route of human exposure. Yet much remains to be studied on the intestinal uptake by humans and the potential this exposure has to result in adverse health effects. Here we review the current knowledge and relate this to lessons learned from the field of nanotoxicology. We discuss how in vitro and in silico approaches can be used to support the risk assessment of nano- and microplastics.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPresent Knowledge in Food Safety
Subtitle of host publicationA Risk-Based Approach through the Food Chain
EditorsM.E. Knowles, L.E. Anelich, A.R. Boobis, B. Popping
PublisherElsevier
Chapter40
Pages590-605
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9780128194706
ISBN (Print)9780128231548
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Oct 2022

Keywords

  • in vitro models
  • microplastics
  • Nanoplastics
  • PBK models
  • toxicity
  • uptake

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