Plasma hepcidin is a modest predictor of dietary iron bioavailability in humans, whereas oral iron loading, measured by stable-isotope appearance curves, increases plasma hepcidin

M.B. Zimmermann, B. Troesch, R. Biebinger, I. Egli, C. Zeder, R.F. Hurrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: Plasma hepcidin appears to be a major regulator of iron absorption and homeostasis, but there are few data in humans. Objectives: With the use of iron stable isotopes, we aimed to determine whether circulating hepcidin predicts dietary iron bioavailability, to quantify the amount of absorbed iron after oral iron loading, and to measure the plasma hepcidin response. Design: In the first study, young women (n = 98) with an iron status varying from iron deficiency anemia to iron sufficiency (women with serum ferritin concentrations 25–40 µg/L were not included) were given stable isotope–labeled test meals (n = 196) containing ferrous sulfate, ferrous fumarate, or ferric pyrophosphate, after which plasma hepcidin and iron bioavailability were measured. In the second study, iron-sufficient men (n = 4) were given 3.8- and 60-mg oral doses of labeled ferrous sulfate. The stable isotope appearance curve was determined, and the plasma hepcidin response was measured over 6 h. Results: In study 1, plasma hepcidin and plasma ferritin were strongly correlated (r = 0.79, P <0.001). Plasma hepcidin significantly, but modestly, predicted iron bioavailability from ferrous sulfate and ferrous fumarate (r = –0.51 and –0.46, respectively; P <0.0001) but not from ferric pyrophosphate (r = –0.30, P = 0.056, respectively). In study 2, the 3.8-mg dose increased mean circulating absorbed iron to a peak of 0.42 µmol/L at 60 min but did not increase plasma hepcidin, The 60-mg dose increased mean circulating absorbed iron to a peak of 5.9 µmol/L at 120 min and produced an 30% increase in mean plasma hepcidin at 6 h (P <0.01). Conclusions: Plasma hepcidin is only a modest predictor of dietary iron bioavailability in humans. Oral iron loading, measured by stable-isotope appearance curves, increases circulating hepcidin
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1280-1287
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume90
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Dietary Iron
Hepcidins
Isotopes
Biological Availability
Iron
ferrous sulfate
Ferritins
Iron Isotopes
Iron-Deficiency Anemias
Meals
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • intestinal epithelial-cells
  • mass-spectrometry
  • serum hepcidin
  • absorption
  • ferroportin
  • deficiency
  • metabolism
  • women
  • mice
  • food

Cite this

@article{ab78e76676ad46a98867a88a841abb42,
title = "Plasma hepcidin is a modest predictor of dietary iron bioavailability in humans, whereas oral iron loading, measured by stable-isotope appearance curves, increases plasma hepcidin",
abstract = "Background: Plasma hepcidin appears to be a major regulator of iron absorption and homeostasis, but there are few data in humans. Objectives: With the use of iron stable isotopes, we aimed to determine whether circulating hepcidin predicts dietary iron bioavailability, to quantify the amount of absorbed iron after oral iron loading, and to measure the plasma hepcidin response. Design: In the first study, young women (n = 98) with an iron status varying from iron deficiency anemia to iron sufficiency (women with serum ferritin concentrations 25–40 µg/L were not included) were given stable isotope–labeled test meals (n = 196) containing ferrous sulfate, ferrous fumarate, or ferric pyrophosphate, after which plasma hepcidin and iron bioavailability were measured. In the second study, iron-sufficient men (n = 4) were given 3.8- and 60-mg oral doses of labeled ferrous sulfate. The stable isotope appearance curve was determined, and the plasma hepcidin response was measured over 6 h. Results: In study 1, plasma hepcidin and plasma ferritin were strongly correlated (r = 0.79, P <0.001). Plasma hepcidin significantly, but modestly, predicted iron bioavailability from ferrous sulfate and ferrous fumarate (r = –0.51 and –0.46, respectively; P <0.0001) but not from ferric pyrophosphate (r = –0.30, P = 0.056, respectively). In study 2, the 3.8-mg dose increased mean circulating absorbed iron to a peak of 0.42 µmol/L at 60 min but did not increase plasma hepcidin, The 60-mg dose increased mean circulating absorbed iron to a peak of 5.9 µmol/L at 120 min and produced an 30{\%} increase in mean plasma hepcidin at 6 h (P <0.01). Conclusions: Plasma hepcidin is only a modest predictor of dietary iron bioavailability in humans. Oral iron loading, measured by stable-isotope appearance curves, increases circulating hepcidin",
keywords = "intestinal epithelial-cells, mass-spectrometry, serum hepcidin, absorption, ferroportin, deficiency, metabolism, women, mice, food",
author = "M.B. Zimmermann and B. Troesch and R. Biebinger and I. Egli and C. Zeder and R.F. Hurrell",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.3945/ajcn.2009.28129",
language = "English",
volume = "90",
pages = "1280--1287",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "5",

}

Plasma hepcidin is a modest predictor of dietary iron bioavailability in humans, whereas oral iron loading, measured by stable-isotope appearance curves, increases plasma hepcidin. / Zimmermann, M.B.; Troesch, B.; Biebinger, R.; Egli, I.; Zeder, C.; Hurrell, R.F.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 90, No. 5, 2009, p. 1280-1287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plasma hepcidin is a modest predictor of dietary iron bioavailability in humans, whereas oral iron loading, measured by stable-isotope appearance curves, increases plasma hepcidin

AU - Zimmermann, M.B.

AU - Troesch, B.

AU - Biebinger, R.

AU - Egli, I.

AU - Zeder, C.

AU - Hurrell, R.F.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Background: Plasma hepcidin appears to be a major regulator of iron absorption and homeostasis, but there are few data in humans. Objectives: With the use of iron stable isotopes, we aimed to determine whether circulating hepcidin predicts dietary iron bioavailability, to quantify the amount of absorbed iron after oral iron loading, and to measure the plasma hepcidin response. Design: In the first study, young women (n = 98) with an iron status varying from iron deficiency anemia to iron sufficiency (women with serum ferritin concentrations 25–40 µg/L were not included) were given stable isotope–labeled test meals (n = 196) containing ferrous sulfate, ferrous fumarate, or ferric pyrophosphate, after which plasma hepcidin and iron bioavailability were measured. In the second study, iron-sufficient men (n = 4) were given 3.8- and 60-mg oral doses of labeled ferrous sulfate. The stable isotope appearance curve was determined, and the plasma hepcidin response was measured over 6 h. Results: In study 1, plasma hepcidin and plasma ferritin were strongly correlated (r = 0.79, P <0.001). Plasma hepcidin significantly, but modestly, predicted iron bioavailability from ferrous sulfate and ferrous fumarate (r = –0.51 and –0.46, respectively; P <0.0001) but not from ferric pyrophosphate (r = –0.30, P = 0.056, respectively). In study 2, the 3.8-mg dose increased mean circulating absorbed iron to a peak of 0.42 µmol/L at 60 min but did not increase plasma hepcidin, The 60-mg dose increased mean circulating absorbed iron to a peak of 5.9 µmol/L at 120 min and produced an 30% increase in mean plasma hepcidin at 6 h (P <0.01). Conclusions: Plasma hepcidin is only a modest predictor of dietary iron bioavailability in humans. Oral iron loading, measured by stable-isotope appearance curves, increases circulating hepcidin

AB - Background: Plasma hepcidin appears to be a major regulator of iron absorption and homeostasis, but there are few data in humans. Objectives: With the use of iron stable isotopes, we aimed to determine whether circulating hepcidin predicts dietary iron bioavailability, to quantify the amount of absorbed iron after oral iron loading, and to measure the plasma hepcidin response. Design: In the first study, young women (n = 98) with an iron status varying from iron deficiency anemia to iron sufficiency (women with serum ferritin concentrations 25–40 µg/L were not included) were given stable isotope–labeled test meals (n = 196) containing ferrous sulfate, ferrous fumarate, or ferric pyrophosphate, after which plasma hepcidin and iron bioavailability were measured. In the second study, iron-sufficient men (n = 4) were given 3.8- and 60-mg oral doses of labeled ferrous sulfate. The stable isotope appearance curve was determined, and the plasma hepcidin response was measured over 6 h. Results: In study 1, plasma hepcidin and plasma ferritin were strongly correlated (r = 0.79, P <0.001). Plasma hepcidin significantly, but modestly, predicted iron bioavailability from ferrous sulfate and ferrous fumarate (r = –0.51 and –0.46, respectively; P <0.0001) but not from ferric pyrophosphate (r = –0.30, P = 0.056, respectively). In study 2, the 3.8-mg dose increased mean circulating absorbed iron to a peak of 0.42 µmol/L at 60 min but did not increase plasma hepcidin, The 60-mg dose increased mean circulating absorbed iron to a peak of 5.9 µmol/L at 120 min and produced an 30% increase in mean plasma hepcidin at 6 h (P <0.01). Conclusions: Plasma hepcidin is only a modest predictor of dietary iron bioavailability in humans. Oral iron loading, measured by stable-isotope appearance curves, increases circulating hepcidin

KW - intestinal epithelial-cells

KW - mass-spectrometry

KW - serum hepcidin

KW - absorption

KW - ferroportin

KW - deficiency

KW - metabolism

KW - women

KW - mice

KW - food

U2 - 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28129

DO - 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28129

M3 - Article

VL - 90

SP - 1280

EP - 1287

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 5

ER -