Plant-soil feedback of native and range expanding plant species is insensitive to temperature

R.H.A. van Grunsven, E.M. Veenendaal, T.M. Bezemer, W.H. van der Putten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Temperature change affects many aboveground and belowground ecosystem processes. Here we investigate the effect of a 5°C temperature increase on plant–soil feedback. We compare plant species from a temperate climate region with immigrant plants that originate from warmer regions and have recently shifted their range polewards. We tested whether the magnitude of plant–soil feedback is affected by ambient temperature and whether the effect of temperature differs between these groups of plant species. Six European/Eurasian plant species that recently colonized the Netherlands (non-natives), and six related species (natives) from the Netherlands were selected. Plant–soil feedback of these species was determined by comparing performance in conspecific and heterospecific soils. In order to test the effect of temperature on these plant–soil feedback interactions, the experiments were performed at two greenhouse temperatures of 20/15°C and 25/20°C, respectively. Inoculation with unconditioned soil had the same effect on natives and non-natives. However, the effect of conspecific conditioned soil was negative compared to heterospecific soil for natives, but was positive for non-natives. In both cases, plant–soil interactions were not affected by temperature. Therefore, we conclude that the temperature component of climate change does not affect the direction, or strength of plant–soil feedback, neither for native nor for non-native plant species. However, as the non-natives have a more positive soil feedback than natives, climate warming may introduce new plant species in temperate regions that have less soil-borne control of abundance
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1059-1069
JournalOecologia
Volume162
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • climate-change
  • changing climate
  • environmental characteristics
  • population-dynamics
  • ammophila-arenaria
  • co2 enrichment
  • pathogens
  • community
  • world
  • biota

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