Plant Selenium Hyperaccumulation Affects Rhizosphere: Enhanced Species Richness and Altered Species Composition

Alyssa T. Cochran, Jemma Bauer, Jessica L. Metcalf, Petra Lovecka, Martina S. de Jong, S. Warris, P.J.W. Mooijman, I.M. van der Meer, Rob Knight, E.A.H. Pilon-Smits

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Little is known about the microbiomes associated with plants with unusual properties, including plants that hyperaccumulate toxic elements such as selenium (Se). Se hyperaccumulators contain up to 1.5% of their dry weight in Se, concentrations shown to affect ecological interactions with herbivores, fungal pathogens and neighboring plants. Hyperaccumulators also enrich their surrounding soil with Se, which may alter the rhizobiome. To investigate whether plant Se affects rhizobacterial diversity and composition, we used a combination of culture-independent and culture-based approaches. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the Illumina platform revealed that the rhizosphere microbiomes of Se hyperaccumulators were significantly different from nonaccumulators from the same site, with a higher average relative abundance of Pedobacter and Deviosa. Additionally, hyperaccumulators harbored a higher rhizobacterial species richness when compared with nonaccumulators from the same family on the same site. Independent from Se present at the site or in the host plant, the bacterial isolates were extremely resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and could reduce selenite to elemental Se. In conclusion, Se hyperaccumulation does not appear to negatively affect rhizobacterial diversity, and may select for certain taxa in the rhizosphere microbiome. Additionally, Se resistance in hyperaccumulator-associated bacteria and archaea may be widespread and not under selection by the host plant.
LanguageEnglish
Pages82-91
JournalPhytobiomes Journal
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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selenium
rhizosphere
species diversity
hyperaccumulators
selenites
Pedobacter
host plants
selenates
Archaea
herbivores
ribosomal RNA
pathogens
bacteria

Cite this

Cochran, Alyssa T. ; Bauer, Jemma ; Metcalf, Jessica L. ; Lovecka, Petra ; de Jong, Martina S. ; Warris, S. ; Mooijman, P.J.W. ; van der Meer, I.M. ; Knight, Rob ; Pilon-Smits, E.A.H. / Plant Selenium Hyperaccumulation Affects Rhizosphere: Enhanced Species Richness and Altered Species Composition. In: Phytobiomes Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 82-91.
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abstract = "Little is known about the microbiomes associated with plants with unusual properties, including plants that hyperaccumulate toxic elements such as selenium (Se). Se hyperaccumulators contain up to 1.5{\%} of their dry weight in Se, concentrations shown to affect ecological interactions with herbivores, fungal pathogens and neighboring plants. Hyperaccumulators also enrich their surrounding soil with Se, which may alter the rhizobiome. To investigate whether plant Se affects rhizobacterial diversity and composition, we used a combination of culture-independent and culture-based approaches. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons using the Illumina platform revealed that the rhizosphere microbiomes of Se hyperaccumulators were significantly different from nonaccumulators from the same site, with a higher average relative abundance of Pedobacter and Deviosa. Additionally, hyperaccumulators harbored a higher rhizobacterial species richness when compared with nonaccumulators from the same family on the same site. Independent from Se present at the site or in the host plant, the bacterial isolates were extremely resistant to selenate and selenite (up to 200 mM) and could reduce selenite to elemental Se. In conclusion, Se hyperaccumulation does not appear to negatively affect rhizobacterial diversity, and may select for certain taxa in the rhizosphere microbiome. Additionally, Se resistance in hyperaccumulator-associated bacteria and archaea may be widespread and not under selection by the host plant.",
author = "Cochran, {Alyssa T.} and Jemma Bauer and Metcalf, {Jessica L.} and Petra Lovecka and {de Jong}, {Martina S.} and S. Warris and P.J.W. Mooijman and {van der Meer}, I.M. and Rob Knight and E.A.H. Pilon-Smits",
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Plant Selenium Hyperaccumulation Affects Rhizosphere: Enhanced Species Richness and Altered Species Composition. / Cochran, Alyssa T.; Bauer, Jemma; Metcalf, Jessica L.; Lovecka, Petra; de Jong, Martina S.; Warris, S.; Mooijman, P.J.W.; van der Meer, I.M.; Knight, Rob; Pilon-Smits, E.A.H.

In: Phytobiomes Journal, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2018, p. 82-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - de Jong, Martina S.

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