Plant functional trait change across a warming tundra biome

Anne D. Bjorkman*, Isla H. Myers-Smith, Sarah C. Elmendorf, Signe Normand, Nadja Rüger, Pieter S.A. Beck, Anne Blach-Overgaard, Daan Blok, J.H.C. Cornelissen, Bruce C. Forbes, Damien Georges, Scott J. Goetz, Kevin C. Guay, Gregory H.R. Henry, Janneke Hillerislambers, Robert D. Hollister, Dirk N. Karger, Jens Kattge, Peter Manning, Janet S. PrevéyChristian Rixen, Gabriela Schaepman-Strub, Haydn J.D. Thomas, Mark Vellend, Martin Wilmking, Sonja Wipf, Michele Carbognani, Luise Hermanutz, Esther Lévesque, Ulf Molau, Alessandro Petraglia, Nadejda A. Soudzilovskaia, Marko J. Spasojevic, Marcello Tomaselli, Tage Vowles, Juha M. Alatalo, Heather D. Alexander, Alba Anadon-Rosell, Sandra Angers-Blondin, Mariska te Beest, Logan Berner, Robert G. Björk, Agata Buchwal, Allan Buras, Katherine Christie, Monique M.P.D. Heijmans, Wim A. Ozinga

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The tundra is warming more rapidly than any other biome on Earth, and the potential ramifications are far-reaching because of global feedback effects between vegetation and climate. A better understanding of how environmental factors shape plant structure and function is crucial for predicting the consequences of environmental change for ecosystem functioning. Here we explore the biome-wide relationships between temperature, moisture and seven key plant functional traits both across space and over three decades of warming at 117 tundra locations. Spatial temperature–trait relationships were generally strong but soil moisture had a marked influence on the strength and direction of these relationships, highlighting the potentially important influence of changes in water availability on future trait shifts in tundra plant communities. Community height increased with warming across all sites over the past three decades, but other traits lagged far behind predicted rates of change. Our findings highlight the challenge of using space-for-time substitution to predict the functional consequences of future warming and suggest that functions that are tied closely to plant height will experience the most rapid change. They also reveal the strength with which environmental factors shape biotic communities at the coldest extremes of the planet and will help to improve projections of functional changes in tundra ecosystems with climate warming.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57–62
JournalNature
Volume526
Early online date26 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Oct 2018

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Plant functional trait change across a warming tundra biome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Projects

    DendroLab

    Project: Other

    Cite this

    Bjorkman, A. D., Myers-Smith, I. H., Elmendorf, S. C., Normand, S., Rüger, N., Beck, P. S. A., Blach-Overgaard, A., Blok, D., Cornelissen, J. H. C., Forbes, B. C., Georges, D., Goetz, S. J., Guay, K. C., Henry, G. H. R., Hillerislambers, J., Hollister, R. D., Karger, D. N., Kattge, J., Manning, P., ... Ozinga, W. A. (2018). Plant functional trait change across a warming tundra biome. Nature, 526, 57–62. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0563-7