Pig performance increases with the addition of DL-methionine and L-lysine to ensiled cassava leaf protein diets

T.H.L. Nguyen, L.D. Ngoan, M.W.A. Verstegen, W.H. Hendriks

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Abstract

Two studies were conducted to determine the impact of supplementation of diets containing ensiled cassava leaves as the main protein source with synthetic amino acids, dl-methionine alone or with L-lysine. In study 1, a total of 40 pigs in five units, all cross-breds between Large White and Mong Cai, with an average initial body weight of 20.5 kg were randomly assigned to four treatments consisting of a basal diet containing 45% of dry matter (DM) from ensiled cassava leaves (ECL) and ensiled cassava root supplemented with 0%, 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.15% dl-methionine (as DM). Results showed a significantly improved performance and protein gain by extra methionine. This reduced the feed cost by 2.6%, 7.2% and 7.5%, respectively. In study 2, there were three units and in each unit eight cross-bred (Large White¿×¿Mong Cai) pigs with an initial body weight of 20.1 kg were randomly assigned to the four treatments. The four diets were as follows: a basal diet containing 15% ECL (as DM) supplemented with different amounts of amino acids l-lysine and dl-methionine to the control diet. The results showed that diets with 15% of DM as ECL with supplementation of 0.2% lysine +0.1% dl-methionine and 0.1% lysine +0.05% dl-methionine at the 20–50 kg and above 50 kg, respectively, resulted in the best performance, protein gain and lowest costs for cross-bred (Large White¿×¿Mong Cai) pigs. Ensiled cassava leaves can be used as a protein supplement for feeding pigs provided the diets contain additional amounts of synthetic lysine and methionine.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-172
JournalTropical Animal Health and Production
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Keywords

  • amino-acids
  • growing pigs
  • root meal
  • leaves
  • digestibility
  • inclusion
  • products
  • quality
  • cyanogens
  • molasses

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