Picosecond Kinetics of Light Harvesting and Photoprotective Quenching in Wild-Type and Mutant Phycobilisomes Isolated from the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803

L. Tian, M. Gwizdala, I.H.M. van Stokkum, R.B.M. Koehorst, D. Kirilovsky, H. van Amerongen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In high light conditions, cyanobacteria dissipate excess absorbed energy as heat in the light-harvesting phycobilisomes (PBs) to protect the photosynthetic system against photodamage. This process requires the binding of the red active form of the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCPr), which can effectively quench the excited state of one of the allophycocyanin bilins. Recently, an in vitro reconstitution system was developed using isolated OCP and isolated PBs from Synechocystis PCC 6803. Here we have used spectrally resolved picosecond fluorescence to study wild-type and two mutated PBs. The results demonstrate that the quenching for all types of PBs takes place on an allophycocyanin bilin emitting at 660 nm (APCQ660) with a molecular quenching rate that is faster than (1 ps)-1. Moreover, it is concluded that both the mechanism and the site of quenching are the same in vitro and in vivo. Thus, utilization of the in vitro system should make it possible in the future to elucidate whether the quenching is caused by charge transfer between APCQ660 and OCP or by excitation energy transfer from APCQ660 to the S1 state of the carotenoid—a distinction that is very hard, if not impossible, to make in vivo.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1692-1700
JournalBiophysical Journal
Volume102
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • orange carotenoid protein
  • chlorophyll-binding protein
  • energy-dissipation
  • photosystem-ii
  • molecular architecture
  • higher-plants
  • fluorescence
  • mechanism
  • organization
  • photoinhibition

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